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UK Rylands Mill - Pagefield College campus - Photographic Report - Feb 2018

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Pagefield mill - photographic report - Feb 2018 

I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes.

Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus.

There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time.

There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth.

Any feedback greatly appreciated thanks.

 

 

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Nice looking brickwork features on the outside, but sadly it's heading the way a lot of these old mills go :( 

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