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Peppermint Powerplant

 

I've seen this particular location a few times before online but I decided to post up a report on it anyway because I think it's quite special with some unique characteristics.

 

History


The Peppermint Powerplant was built in conjunction to a nearby paper mill with the purpose of supplying electricity to the mill. The plant features a stunning peppermint colour scheme on the singular turbine and control panels. The turbine itself was produced by Siemens, a company established in 1904 in Berlin and is currently one of the most prominent manufactures of high powered gas turbines worldwide. The plant n also hosted two Steinmüller boilers. One of which was commissioned in 1954 and the other in 1965. Both the power station and the paper mill were decommissioned around 1999. From what we could see the paper mill had been stripped. But despite being closed for nearly 20 years the power station has remained in very nice condition.

 

Visit


Last stop for the day on a Euro trip with @darbians. We both wanted to see this site so we decided it was worth having a quick look before it got too dark. Even though it wasn't a large site there was still a good amount to photograph, in fact I wish I took more but here are the ones I did manage to get. 

 

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(Excuse the awkward handheld shot)

 

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(Getting pretty dark by this point so we called it a day)

 

 

Hope you enjoyed reading my report.

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Looks nice and clean even after 20 years! Some cool looking gauges and dials there too :17_heart_eyes:

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On ‎01‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 8:53 PM, The Urban Collective said:

Stunning pics dude really quality place looks almost mint condition I enjoyed this one dude nice one man.

 

Thank you! It was so nice :5_smiley:

On ‎02‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 1:34 PM, Andy said:

Always nice to see, great set.

 

Thank you :14_relaxed:

On ‎02‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 11:52 PM, hamtagger said:

Looks nice and clean even after 20 years! Some cool looking gauges and dials there too :17_heart_eyes:

 

Crazy isn't it? Very cool! Might need to go back at some point :15_yum:

On ‎03‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 4:41 AM, peanutbutter_crackers said:

This is a really awesome place! Great photos!!! :17_heart_eyes:

 

 

Thank you! :11_blush:

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On ‎10‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 12:50 PM, scrappy said:

Great colours here, very nice.

 

Thank you :12_slight_smile:

On ‎10‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 11:40 PM, The_Raw said:

All the yes to this. Mint :thumb

 

Thank you mate! Loved this one :15_yum:

4 hours ago, Dubbed Navigator said:

I'm really surprised at how well thats held out for without being even remotely trashed. Very pleasing on the eye, nice one!

 

I was as well! It looked liked it was only left a few years ago, if that! And thank you :1_grinning:

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