Jump to content
The_Raw

Italy Manicomio di R, Italy - February 2018

Recommended Posts

This had been on my to-do list for some time having seen previous reports. I suppose for that reason it was more of a pilgrimage than an explore but well enjoyable nonetheless. We made a right meal of getting in here but it was necessary with the amount of activity near where we wanted to be. :shock: Not to mention the security chickens and sheep announcing our presence to all and sundry. :roll: The snow didn't help either, making sure we had no choice but to 'leave only footprints' from one end of the site to the other. :sad:Anyway, nobody came looking for us luckily and what a belter of a place. The main building is not only stunning but has some intact operating rooms full of equipment. I could have spent all day in there and I'll most likely pop back if ever in the area again as I'm told there is a morgue somewhere. We did try a few other buildings but they were mostly bricked up and the ones we got into didn't have much inside. A fruitful trip with elliot5200 and @shaddam

 

Built in 1871, the site began as a charity hospital. It then became a military training college before turning into a psychiatric hospital. It was commonly referred to as "the factory of ideas" by locals. About 500 people worked there as doctors, clerks, nurses, and maintenance staff. It's busiest period of admissions came during WWII where the number of patients never fell below 1,000. The total number of patients reached it's peak of 1,400 in the 1960s. It was closed in 1981 when Basaglia law came into force. This was the act which signified a large reform of the psychiatric system in Italy.

 

 

1.

40533438071_75bb24edb1_b.jpg

 

2.
26662489298_4837ba990e_b.jpg

 

3.
26662629868_b5a869c7c5_b.jpg

 

4.
25663172287_e8243f90f7_b.jpg

 

5.
25663144367_e955cbc00a_b.jpg

 

6.
25663138987_74f181675f_b.jpg

 

7.
25662985737_eeb33c4c93_c.jpg  

 

8.

39638705665_691ff81890_c.jpg

 

9.
39823085214_82d20b1066_b.jpg

 

10.

39823167854_48a30bc8b7_b.jpg

 

11.

26662504618_412f1b729d_b.jpg

 

12.
25663161437_18945fd500_c.jpg

 

13.
25663116147_68f874d0fd_b.jpg

 

14.
40490892052_fd63a77869_b.jpg

 

15. One of the other buildings with little inside
40491016572_f33df4ed03_b.jpg

 

16.

39987871444_15f6e49698_b.jpg

 

17.
26662519548_be02918010_b.jpg

 

18.
25663020737_4379dbf3ca_b.jpg

 

19.
26662530328_016020cc99_b.jpg

 

20.

40533567361_157c72cbd3_b.jpg

 

21.
38723415270_2c35131536_b.jpg

 

22.
40533573971_ed83758e9e_b.jpg

 

23.
39638653045_34cc4c1de5_b.jpg

 

24.
38887164740_5ab919c709_b.jpg

 

25.
25663062257_13d34be3e7_b.jpg

 

26.
26662588168_d2a23fbbe0_b.jpg

 

27.

38723402550_6d405ca897_c.jpg

 

28. Not a baaaaad explore at all
39986803034_69a622a1df_z.jpg

 

Thanks for looking :thumb

 

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As usual, great pictures again. :) 
On my first visit in 2012, I was there for about seven hours. And even in this longer time I haven't seen everything. Some parts of the buildings are winding & twisty, what is partly a bit confusing like a maze - because some stairways and corridors don't lead to all floors and areas. That's why you sometimes have to go upstairs, walk along corridors & around corners, and then continue on another staircase. For example, there are also bedrooms and several beds somewhere. A friend of mine has found them by chance; I haven't seen these yet (I only found one bed inside of a small room). So worth to return. Maybe we can go there together someday... :) 

Just a pity that all the beautiful ivy in the corridors of the inner courtyard has been removed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Andy said:

As usual, great pictures again. :) 
On my first visit in 2012, I was there for about seven hours. And even in this longer time I haven't seen everything. Some parts of the buildings are winding & twisty, what is partly a bit confusing like a maze - because some stairways and corridors don't lead to all floors and areas. That's why you sometimes have to go upstairs, walk along corridors & around corners, and then continue on another staircase. For example, there are also bedrooms and several beds somewhere. A friend of mine has found them by chance; I haven't seen these yet (I only found one bed inside of a small room). So worth to return. Maybe we can go there together someday... :) 

Just a pity that all the beautiful ivy in the corridors of the inner courtyard has been removed.

 

Yeah we missed the beds as well. I could have spent the whole day in there but the other guys were already finished. I think I'm almost as slow as you taking photo these days ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, The_Raw said:

 

Yeah we missed the beds as well. I could have spent the whole day in there but the other guys were already finished. I think I'm almost as slow as you taking photo these days ;)

 

Slow? I'm just precisely while exploring and choosing the angles. :-P:-D 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Andy said:

 

Slow? I'm just precisely while exploring and choosing the angles. :-P:-D 

 

Yes, 16 different angles of the same shot! ;)

35 minutes ago, franconiangirl said:

Awesome captures! I especially love no. 23 and the last one with the nosy sheep. ;-)

 

Thanks! There were only 4 sheep to begin with, and then about 30 came running out towards us!

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10.3.2018 at 10:54 PM, The_Raw said:

 

Yes, 16 different angles of the same shot! ;)

 

 

16? You're exaggerating. Maximum 15 ... :D;) 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Such beautiful photos! This is another awesome place! I need to go to Italy! I've not traveled out of the U.S sadly....haven't really traveled that far even within the U.S :cry:

Edited by peanutbutter_crackers
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/21/2018 at 2:00 PM, peanutbutter_crackers said:

Such beautiful photos! This is another awesome place! I need to go to Italy! I've not traveled out of the U.S sadly....haven't really traveled that far even within the U.S :cry:

 

Thank you. Italy's a beautiful place. If you ever decide to go drop me a message :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that is a wonderfully decayed building, but in such good nick!  I'd love to go here.  I am well overdue a Euro Tour!  I think Italy should be the first stop!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Landie_Man said:

Now that is a wonderfully decayed building, but in such good nick!  I'd love to go here.  I am well overdue a Euro Tour!  I think Italy should be the first stop!

 

Some amazing places there. The asylums were the highlight so far for me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/28/2018 at 4:55 AM, The_Raw said:

 

Thank you. Italy's a beautiful place. If you ever decide to go drop me a message :)

 

Will do! My grandfather is from Italy and I've wanted to visit because of that. He hailed from Florence I believe

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By anthrax
      This is inside of a factory that was once used for producing the somewhat famous Pandur-Tanks. 
      This area of the factory closed sometime in 2015/16, with first signs showing as early as 2010. At first the company decided to restructure by stopping production and only using the plant at this location for tank maintenance, service and repair. When this decision was finalized about 60% of employees were dismissed. Reasoning - there wasn't enough demand for new vehicles. In late 2016 the police was called to a so called "illegal rave" that was held in one of the former production halls. Tens of thousands of euros in equipment were left behind.
       
      full story
      50+ pics
       
       
      DSC_5646 by anthrax, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_6939 by anthrax, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_5665 by anthrax, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_5724 by anthrax, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_5739 by anthrax, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_6707 by anthrax, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_6743_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_6812 by anthrax, auf Flickr
       
       
    • By obscureserenity
      Campina Youth House
       
       
      Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found..
       
      History

      The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to  showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. 
       
       
      Visit

      Visited with @darbians and @Gigi on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report!
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
      When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof 
       

       

       
       
      Thanks for reading!
       
    • By Lenston
      History 
       
      The engineering company J.E. Billups of Cardiff who also constructed Mireystock Bridge and the masonry work on the Lydbrook viaduct commenced construction of the tunnel in 1872 using forest stone. The tunnel is 221 metres in length and took 2 years to construct. The tunnel allowed the connection of the Severn and Wye Valley railway running from Lydney with the Ross and Monmouth network at Lydbrook. The first mineral train passed through the tunnel on 16 August 1874. Passenger services commenced in September 1875 pulled by the engine Robin Hood.
       
      The history of this section of line is not without incident - a railway ganger was killed in the tunnel by a train in 1893 and a locomotive was derailed by a fallen block of stone in the cutting at the northern entrance in 1898.
      The line officially closed to passenger trains in July 1929 but goods trains continued to use the line until the closure of Arthur & Edward Colliery at Waterloo in 1959 and Cannop Colliery in 1960. Lifting of the track was completed in 1962. The tunnel and cutting were buried with spoil in the early 1970's.
       
      Thanks to the vision and enthusiasm of a group of local Forest railway enthusiasts assisted by Forest Enterprise the top of the northern portal of the tunnel (with its unusual elliptical shape) which has lain buried for 30 years has now been exposed. 
      As of 2018 the tunnel now still lays abandoned with no sign of the cycle track and the £50,000 funding seemingly gone to waste.
       
      Pics
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Thanks for looking
    • By bob
      Lil mix of religious spots in Italia  ❤️
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
       
       
×