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Landie_Man

UK James Thomas Engineering, Worcester, England - March 2018

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Visited with Mookster on a small short road trip around the midlands back in March.  This site was absolutely wrecked throughout and of little interest.  An 80s style factory which closed sometime in 2016.  But it was still an explore!

 

James Thomas Engineering was started in a small garage in Bishampton England in 1977. The business grew and moved to a converted office unit, to a much larger 5000 square foot unit in 1980. 

This planted the seeds for a new industry leader in aluminium all purpose truss design. By 1983, James Thomas developed a pre-rigged truss design used by major rock bands on world tours.

 

By 1990, JTE began manufacturing in the USA to keep truss design moving on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Come 1992, the super truss system was designed. The Company was Liquidated in 2017

 

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More At:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157694367095931

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Too bad that so much has already been destroyed. But I like the first photo with the frozen puddles in the foreground.

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