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France Feste Prinz Regent Luitpold, France - 2017

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This was our first Metz German Fortification of the day and it did not disappoint. GF L'Yser is filled with murals and paintings, which are incredible and fortunately survive after nearly 100 years. Visited with @flat and a few other non-members

History:

The Feste Prinz Regent Luitpold, renamed Group Fortification Yser after 1919, is a military installation near Metz that was constructed between 1907 and 1914. It is part of the second fortified belt of forts of Metz and formed part of a wider program of fortifications called "Moselstellung", encompassing fortresses scattered between Thionville and Metz in the valley Moselle. The aim of Germany was to protect against a French attack to take back Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle from the German Empire. The fortification system was designed to accommodate the growing advances in artillery since the end of XIXth century. Based on new defensive concepts, such as dispersal and concealment, the fortified group was to be, in case of attack, an impassable barrier for French forces. 

During The Annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the fort receives a garrison of gunners belonging to the XVIth Army Corps. From 1914-1918, it served as a relay for the German soldiers at the front post. Its equipment and weapons are then at the forefront of military technology. In 1919, the fort was occupied by the French army. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the fort into the defensive system set up around Metz.

Must go back

Outer fighting block:

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DDE_5447 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5457 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5459 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5462 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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Turreted by Nick, on Flickr

Main block

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DDE_5494 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5507 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5511 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5528 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5533 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5543 copy by Nick, on Flickr

The Murals

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DDE_5563 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5506 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5586 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5503 copy by Nick, on Flickr

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DDE_5588 copy by Nick, on Flickr

38703257110_46def56634_b.jpg
DDE_5587 copy by Nick, on Flickr
 

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Great pics! I was there in October last year, At that time, the green graffiti "Mort aux SS" didn't exist yet.

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