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Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste

 

 

History

 

Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname  'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers.  It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. 

 

Visit

 

I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.'  After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town.  Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos!

 

 

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If you've got this far, thanks for reading :thumb

 

 

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I remember your excitement at this one  but i didnt realise it was this good! Lovely pics too. Loving all those vintage bottles especially! 😋😋😃😃😁😁😃😃😋😋

Edited by a World in Ruins
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21 hours ago, a World in Ruins said:

I remember your excitement at this one  but i didnt realise it was this good! Lovely pics too. Loving all those vintage bottles especially! 😋😋😃😃😁😁😃😃😋😋

 

It was beautiful 😍 I'll have to take you when we go to France! The vintage bottles made me so happy haha! 😄

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This place is absolutely fantastic. Old furniture, pictures, bottles and chemistry things, decay ... Awesome, exactly my taste. I would love to see it by my own. Really great.

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On ‎6‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 8:51 AM, Andy said:

This place is absolutely fantastic. Old furniture, pictures, bottles and chemistry things, decay ... Awesome, exactly my taste. I would love to see it by my own. Really great.

Thank you! Yeah, it was right up my street! If you end up in France at any point I'd definitely recommend popping in :)

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On ‎6‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 4:07 PM, AndyK! said:

Some lovely pics there, nice job

Thank you Andy :)

On ‎6‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 8:36 PM, Satori said:

Amazing!!! congratulation👌

 

Thank you 😃

On ‎6‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 4:29 PM, Dubbed Navigator said:

This is absoutely top drawer, great location, great writeup, super sharp pics. :comp:

 

Thank you very much!

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