Jump to content
The_Raw

UK Engedi Chapel, Caernarfon - May 2018

Recommended Posts

Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed.

The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom.

The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair.

 

One thing Wales has in abundance is abandoned chapels. They're not my kind of thing especially but as chapels go this is a pretty decent one. Andy K found this a couple of years ago and amazingly it hasn't changed a lot bar some extra pigeons and their wicked ways. Visited again with @Andy & @Miss.Anthrope.

 

1.
41341674645_33d7ded97c_b.jpg

 

2.
27371863947_cddf4838c8_b.jpg

 

3.
42352718691_76b47d3fff_b.jpg

 

4.

42784522151_6625c8ed1a_b.jpg

 

5.
41630246924_81650e8576_b.jpg

 

6.

40434965210_6d194f7cbc_b.jpg

 

7.
41520954614_86ca005cfa_b.jpg

 

8.
40545767090_28c3b2000f_b.jpg

 

9.
40545727260_b3c9991c4d_b.jpg

 

10.
42352737271_3d5d0efed5_b.jpg

 

11.
42352747361_f4b4625107_b.jpg

 

12.
27483144577_7a829519b7_b.jpg

 

Diolch am edrych eto :thumb

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was very lucky that we could visit it, was a really great place. But I haven't edited my photos yet.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By lucan
      all that remains of a decoy airfield 
      small bunker type construction with a searchlight mounted on top  and a small room at the back to house a gennerator
      fires would have been light at night at this location to fool the german bombers to target here instead of  the real site a few miles away
      the searchlight platform is now fallien off and just a pile of bricks and metal
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      thanks for looking
    • By lucan
      Spotted this while out and about so popped in for a look, not a great deal left behind
      In the middle of a small town on the Shropshire border
      Had to be fairly quiet as it is surrounded by houses
      Looks like its not been lived in for a couple of years
      A stable block out back, loads of TV sets and old Playstation mags , one of which gives the name I gave the place
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
      thanks for looking
    • By a World in Ruins
      First a little History [you all know it, but it's good to include anyway] 😃
       
      The Dispensary – the first public hospital in North Staffordshire – opened in Etruria in April 1804 and was funded in part by the Wedgewood family. It gave sick patients the chance to see an Apothecary for diagnosis and treatment. It also provided vaccination against the dreaded smallpox, thanks to the pioneering work of Dr Edward Jenner. Shortly afterwards the 11-bed House of Recovery was opened for fever patients, followed by facilities to treat general and accident patients.
      The hospital continued to expand, due to a steady flow of general illness cases, accidents in the pottery, mining and iron industries and diseases caused by lead and dust. In 1819 it moved to a bigger site in Etruria. By this point it employed a small team of support staff, including a matron and nurses, and ran education programmes urging mine and factory owners to improve their safety standards. Thanks to new ideas about infection control, the building - surrounded by polluting factories - was increasingly seen as unsuitable for patients and was also at risk of collapse from heavy undermining. Eventually, the decision was made to move the infirmary to Hartshill. The clean, quiet suburb became home in 1869 to the North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary, which later merged with the City General Hospital to form the University Hospital of North Staffordshire – now the Royal Stoke University Hospital. Previously the hospital was known as The North Staffordshire Infirmary and Eye Hospital (1815 - 1911) as well as The North Staffordshire Infirmary (1912 - 1926). 
      The building closed down as a medical facility in 2012 as part of the super-hospital development at the Royal Stoke University Hospital.
       
      The explore: Visited with David [ Scrappy ]. It rained, a lot. 😀
      The morgue was a bit of a let down as the slabs had recently been removed and placed in a nearby corridor in front of the fridges. Oh well....
       
      On to the photographs, hope you enjoy:
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

×