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Italy Power stations , Italy , Sept. 2017

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Nice pictures!

Even if these are different places, it would be nice to know something about the buildings. For example you could write something about the history and / or a short report about the exploration.

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I was taken to them buy a Italian urbexer and we spent 2 full on days and 1200k's going all over the show so I have very little info to give . 

 

All I know is that they are in the north of Italy , 1st , 2nd , 3rd and 7th photos are the remains of a 1920'ish hydroelectric and the 4th , 5th and 6th photos was 1950ish coal or gas  . 7th photo shows some words on the far wall , I understand that they mean "No smoking" . Some switch boards around that plant were made out of solid slabs of marble up to 2m high with bare wires linking the connectors behind them so it must of been very dangerous working around them !   Both had newer operating  power stations running right along side them so it wasnt easy to get in especially the first one  , matter of fact I am very lucky that I didnt brake a leg getting back over a high fence , in a bit of a panic when we heard a car coming I went to  quickly jump into long grass from the top of the 2.5m high fence . The leg of my jeans got cort on the top of the fence , somehow I managed to still land upright  . 

 

Sorry that I cant tell you where but  I couldnt even find my way back to them if you  gave me transport to go there ! 

 

I have a load more photos from that insane  2 days that I will share at a later date .

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Thank you.

Just to avoid misunderstandings: It was not about finding out where the places are or to know their real names. It's simply nicer to add a little report to the photos as well. That's all. :) 

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