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Germany Abandoned Beacon in the baltic sea

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An abandoned beacon in the baltic sea. There are two of it. One 1000m and the other one in 4000m distance from the runway.

Ther were used to enlarge the range of the runway ...so the pilots could navigate easier to the short runway.

 

Build and used by the NVA. The army of the former GDR... (DDR).

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Really cool place and nice pictures!
First I read "abandoned bacon" ... :D

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vor 2 Stunden schrieb The_Raw:

Great report! Must have taken some effort to get there

Indeed, we had to climb it from a little boat... it was quite an adventure:)

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