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Since 1961, a one-room grocery store has been operating in the countryside. In the other part of the building lived the shop owners. Later, the store belonged to other people, until 1992, when it left the Russian government, it was closed because it no longer met the requirements of the store. People were still living in the building, when they died, he was abandoned :)

My instagram- laiko_pamirsti

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  • Similar Content

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      I may have got a bit carried away with photos of this entrance hall


       


       


       


       


       


       


       


      The floor above


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      The back of the building was in worse condition


       

                   
       


       
       
                    
       
       

       
       

       
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    • By Dale68
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      Nope


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      Thanks for looking.
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