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History

This factory was opened in 1900 and made cardboard out of straw, in that time this product was very popular so 8 years later the made another factory next to the other one.

In 1968 the factory closed due to competition from abroad, after the factory was closed it was sold off to a men who repaired and sold off machines. The new owner only did nothing about maintenance of the old factory so the factory complex decayed rapidly. in 2005 the original factory was demolished and the other factory was luckily protected as a monument. Later in 2009 the restoration began on the still standing factory. 6 years later the company who began with the restoration began to have financial troubles so the factory was abandoned again. After being abandoned for 1 year the factory was bought on a auction for an incredible low price, after that the restoration was back on track again.

 

Explore

We went on a Sunday so the workers waren't working on the building. When we got there, there was a door opened so we could enter the beautiful old factory building. The highlight of the building was the old Turbine and the old ovens.

 

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Hope you enjoyed my post! 

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2 minutes ago, jones-y-gog said:

I certainly did enjoy this post and if you have more then don't hesitate!

Thank you! in about 3 weeks i have more stuff to post.

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      Thanks For Looking 
       
      More pics on my Flicker page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157670753473708/with/43157314391/
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