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This place was a restaurant, incredible restaurant!!

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Edited by Dubbed Navigator
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On 7/17/2018 at 1:53 AM, crabb said:

Really nice photos, loving the cockpit view

Thanks ! it was under the sun.... so very hot inside!

On 7/24/2018 at 8:37 AM, Andy said:

The cockpit looks really cool.

thanks, it  was incredibly conserved

On 7/17/2018 at 8:17 PM, obscureserenity said:

Very nice! The cockpit photos look great. 

thanks!!!

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