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Italy Red Cross Hospital - June 2018

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Lovely images Kat, I think this place was my joint fave on that trip, so photogenic. And to think we nearly missed the classroom if it wasnt for ninja! Imagine! 😮😃😮😃😮 

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5 hours ago, a World in Ruins said:

Lovely images Kat, I think this place was my joint fave on that trip, so photogenic. And to think we nearly missed the classroom if it wasnt for ninja! Imagine! 😮😃😮😃😮 

 

Thank you James! It was very stunning, wasn't it? :D one of my favourites too, after Di R of course! You know! Good thing we had ninja to sniff everything out for us 😂😂

2 hours ago, Lenston said:

Nice images there Kat :thumb 

 

Thank you :D 

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36 minutes ago, AndyK! said:

Nice pics there 🤩

 

Thank you Andy :)

23 minutes ago, Hooismans said:

Great pics! would love to visit this location one time

 

Thank you! You really should, it's a great location :) 

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  • Similar Content

    • By Gromr123
      Visited here twice over the span of a week, once with the SO, and the second with mookster,Brewtal, Zotez and obscurity.
      It's a big place and I didn't realise how much I'd missed till the second visit!

      History
      Bulstrode house (listed grade II) lies towards the centre of the park. Rebuilt by Benjamin Ferrey 1860-2 for the twelfth Duke of Somerset, probably incorporating elements of the earlier buildings, it is a rambling, red-brick, Tudor-style building with an imposing tower over the main, north entrance and a French Renaissance-style colonnade on the south front giving access to the adjoining south terrace. The enclosed Inner Court, a service courtyard, is attached to the east side of the house, with various C20 buildings close by. Attached to the north-east corner of the house is the Outer Court, entered from the forecourt through a Gothic arch with a ducal crest in the gable, flanked by railings and brick piers with stone caps. The other three sides of this court have a Gothic loggia fronting a single-storey building; access to the Inner Court is through a gateway on the south side.
       
      In 1966, the community moved to Kent, and the property was bought by WEC International, a Christian evangelist missionary organisation who have gradually restored and improved the public parts of the house's interior.
      The house was put up for sale in 2016 and it's now intended to be turned into a luxury hotel. It was also used recently as a film set for the latest Johnny English film.

      The Explore
      A pretty simple one, apart from having to wade through a muddy bog in a field. The house is huge and even after a few hours I felt like I'd need a re-visit the following week to see the rest of it, especially with the snow and ice making parts like the rooftops terrifying slippery. The second visit was a lovely sunny day and much more pleasant.
      Unfortunately the local kids have been getting in and really smashing the place up good and proper. A real shame as its got some really nice original features.
       
      The Fire alarms still worked and these were pretty much going off 24/7, which was great to cover up the noise of us moving around inside, but also really really annoying! However Brewtal made it his personal mission to find the fuseboard and turn them off. Took him a little while but he did it! Bliss at last.
      When WEC International left in 2016 they stripped out pretty much everything and so a good chunk of the rooms are empty and not too interesting. However the whole lower floor/Basement level had some really nice interesting bits and the power still worked!
       
      We were doing really well until we set off some PIR alarms in one of the outbuildings while we were leaving. Whoops!
      Turned out to be a great explore!

      The Photos
       
      Externals
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Internals
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      ]
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      The clock tower mechanism which still could be operated.
       

       

       

      The Basement level. Most the lights worked!
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By True_British_Metal
      大家好!
       
      My oh my, how long has it been since I posted a report? Exploring has become a low priority for me ever since I left the UK, even if I've always kept tabs on new sites shared here and on social media. Truth be told learning Mandarin and my lady have taken a much bigger priority in recent years, plus my lady is no fan of me going about it alone so that makes organising jaunts more challenging. I have visited a fair few sites around Taiwan, but compared to Europe there is so little here to get me to jump on the next train there because beautiful architecture is just so rare and even noteworthy industrial sites are few and far between; many places are just rotting concrete shells. So this report here is meant to be a compilation of my latest explores to date which I feel don't have enough bite to warrant standalone reports.
       
      There will be more reports to come in the future, but since I left my torch and tripod in England it will be some time before I visit these. I trust the results will not be disappointing though.
       
      亞哥花園/Encore Garden, July 2018
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      I'd always been aware of this one, as it's situated close to my favourite hiking trails just outside of Taizhong where I live. But being me I never made a move until last year. It's an abandoned theme park in Dakeng district, opened in 1981 and was a hugely popular site that attracted around 1m people a year. Like several sites in Taiwan it was hit by the 921 earthquake in 1999 which severely damaged the area, causing attendance to drop dramatically. Eventually the financial losses incurred forced the place to close in 2008.
       

      On most days there is a security guard with dogs at the top of the site, living in a shack. However as of last year the entire site has been repurposed as a rally racetrack. Pay $100 (that's £2.50) to enter and you can sit back and spectate, but before that we chose to explore the park first. Initially we were in full stealth mode, when we spotted people in hi vis vests dotted around the site as well as the guard's dogs barking at us, but after seeing others drive round with their scooters we realised it was a free for all for today.
       

      What I found really fascinating about exploring in Taiwan compared to Europe and other places is how the fertile, humid tropical enviroment is far more hostile to built structures which means nature takes over rapidly once the place is abandoned; the restaurant was completely covered in thick, thick dust, and other structures had started to be completely invaded by tree branches.

       

       
      Old arcade machines left behind

       

       
      Because of thick shrub finding the entrance to this ride took a bit of careful searching, but we got to it.

       

       
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      I then made my way inside the buildings in the middle of the site, and was stunned to find the power still on. It turns out even on a Sunday there were workers inside. Unfortunately the site manager walked in, then politely asked me to leave after this photo was taken.

       

       

       
      It's far from epic, but it's well worth sharing as it's so vastly different from Crapalot. I'm still alive by the way...

       
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    • By Lenston
      We all know the history of this place and with so many reports going up recently but here is a short version.
       
      Inspired by Tumbles i decided to shoot some old BW Film.
       
      History
       
      Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s.
      Whitchurch Hospital finally closed its doors in April, 2016 and is due to be stripped down and dismantled.
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Thanks for looking
       
    • By AndyK!
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      Aerial view of the site after becoming Bentwaters Parks

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      The Star Wars Building


      Concrete blast walls


      Entrance of the Star Wars Building






      Medical Facility

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      We didn’t get passed the gate!



      Entrance to the Bomb Stores


      Armoured Guard House






      One of the storage facilities with overhead cables

      One of the store buildings had a couple of old fire engines parked up behind it....








      Planes and Helicopters

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      Exxperious modelling his entry into "Miss Fighter Jet 2018"



























      K-9 Building

      The K-9 building contains spacious dog kennels.


      K-9 Building


      Kennels inside the K-9 Building




      Hangers

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      One of the many hangers


      Typical interior of the hangers


      Original sliding door controls


      The framework sits on rails and supports the huge doors, allowing them to slide fully open


      527th Aggressor Squadron Hardened Aircraft Shelter


      Deputy Commander Operations

      This building had been out of use for quite some time and is suffering a lot of decay. The moisture and condensation cause constant rainfall inside the building, which was ideal for plant growth.


      Deputy Commander Operations building





      Runway, Control Tower and Maintenance Vehicles

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      The Control Tower pictured in 1972


      The Control Tower today (poor quality due to crazy crop, as we didn't go over there!)


      North/South runway with the control tower in the distance


      De-icer truck





      The Hush House

      Originally built as a jet engine testing facility with an exhaust tunnel, the Hush House was a soundproofed hangar where fighter


      Exterior of the exhaust tunnel


      Interior of the Hush House


      The exhaust tunnel


      Hush House control booth and viewing window


      Thanks for looking!


      Of course I got a selfie!
    • By Andy
      I already visited this former school in Italy last summer.
       
      I don't know if the rumor is true; but I heard that the globe is not original. Allegedly, the previously existing globe was stolen. Then, so is said, a photographer brought another globe and put it there. But as I said, I don't know if this story is true.
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      Mostly you can only see photos of the one classroom with the globe online. That's why it was important for me to photograph and show other rooms from there as well.
       
       
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