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Spain Central Termica Power Station - Alcudia, Mallorca - July 2018

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I know this place has been done many times before but it is right up my alley and was a tantalizing temptation whilst the rest of the family slept/swam in the villa pool.

Thanks for the tip from a fellow member here. The last report/intel from here was 2014 so it has been a while.

Things have changed security wise. The holes are patched up and there are 2 new heras style fences inside the main boundary. The main problem with these was that the point of tackling them was very exposed to the street  and adjacent dock.

Inside, not much has changed.

The 'slot window' access point was amusing, the width being about an inch narrower than my back to chest distance and the height being about 4inches shorter than my groin to shoulder height. It took some contorting, and at one point I thought I was well and truly stuck, but in the end, I managed-I was too close to give up.

 

6am start meant it was a bit dark for photography. By the time I got out, the families were on their balconies and I yelled Ola to them as I jumped over the 4th and final barrier to safety.

 

It was constructed in 1958 according to a design by the Spanish architect Ramón Vázquez Molezún.

Running gear and T/G were provided by Metropolitan Vickers.

In 1986 The Spanish government commissioned a new Powerplant around 10km away on the other side of the bay. 

The plant was closed in 1991/2.



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The 2 rooms I really came for-

 

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