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  • Similar Content

    • By Poopydoopy
      Hi guys, im very new to exploring but I already love it. Looking for cool and easy places to explore in or around the Savannah, Georgia area. Any cool recommendations? I barely find anything when i google urbex. Thanks in advance
    • By KPUrban_
      A little while before our first of two visits I had been surfing the internet for hospital closures, looking for a site some way away. Then, out of nowhere, this pops up....

      At first I was skeptical and decided to have a little dig in the forums and almost nothing turned up.

      So it was a shot in the dark from then on.
       
      At the time we knew nothing and quickly found ourselves on our fist visit wandering about. Eventually we stumbled upon an entry in what we now know is the radiotherapy department. After sending in a friend then having him return for a torch, it soon confirmed the hassle of getting was worthwhile.
      It came a surprise to find that literally everything works and a lot was already running. Hearing the Aircon unit gave everything a feel as if we really shouldn't be there then to find that all the lights worked as well as the machines and water supplies made this quite unique.

       
      Then, as we walked around the corner we bumped into security, who smelled like he had a joint or two earlier. Anyway he talked to us about how they live inside the building and mentioned we were the first people he had ever caught. Let us out and that was that...

      Roll on a month or so and we had been given a hint about the operating theaters, so we gave it a go.

      Once in we noticed that there was more than one room and that both were designed for eye surgery. Anyways with that we had a look around.
       

      One room used to be a theater but the light is long gone.








       
      Anyways, with that we left
       
    • By UK Abandoned Mine Explores
      In this one, we return to the Mine of 1000 ladders, where we finally get to the upper workings, then find something very old and very huge, that none of us expected.  If you enjoy, please like the video and consider subscribing.
       
      Facebook group : https://www.facebook.com/groups/330926504215298/
       
      Video on Youtube : https://youtu.be/e_G4DDSpuPE
    • By Forgotten Productions
      We are Forgotten Productions, Urban Explorers from Toronto,Canada.
      We are looking forward to sharing our adventures with you all through photos and video footage. We try and bring a little bit of fun to exploring while still showing you everything that has been left behind in its current beauty.
       
      Please show us your support by Subscribing to our YouTube Channel 
      https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNp-X7HUAx9iVMn1unDv1JA
      Or following us on Instagram 
      @forgotten_productions_416 
       
      For more updates on what we are up to find us on Facebook and Twitter 
      Love you guy's thanks for your support 👊
    • By obscureserenity
      History
       
      Kelenföld Power Plant is located in Budapest and was originally established in 1914, in conjunction with Hungary's electrification program. It was known as one of the most sophisticated and technologically advanced throughout Europe and supplied electricity to the entire capital.  The site itself featured the first boiler house as an electrical supply building in the city. Between 1922 and 1943 the plant underwent two extension phases which introduced 19 modernised steam boilers and 8 turbines. These were operated at 38 bar steam pressure and transferred the increasing demand for electricity through 30 kV direct consumer cables. The equipment used was considered state of the art at the current time and was all produced by Hungarian manufacturers. By the 1930s the facility contributed to 60% of Budapest's heating and hot water which made up 4% of the country's overall energy supply. 
       
      The infamous Art Deco control room, also known as 'Special K' was completed in 1927, after two years of construction. Designed by notable architects Kálmán Reichl and Virgil Borbíro, because of this, it's listed as a  protected site under Hungarian law and cannot be restored or destroyed. The Kelenföld control room is widely acclaimed as one of the most stunning monuments of industrial art. It uniquely explores the boundaries between functionality and grandeur, featuring a decorative oval skylight alongside the retro style green panels, hosting a range of buttons, dials, and gauges. Once the Second World War had begun, a small concrete shelter was added for the employees. This was due to the ornate glass ceiling,  as it was considered to be a target during the bombing raids in the city.
       
      By 1962 the plant was modernised again with accordance to the heat supply demands of the capital. The existing condensing technology was replaced with back pressure heating turbines and hot water boilers. This increased reliability, as coal was steadily becoming more outdated and inefficient. In 1972 gas turbines with a capacity of 32 MWe were integrated into the plant and were the first to be put into operation throughout Hungary. In 1995 another redevelopment phase was initiated which provided the power station with a heat recovery steam generator and later on in 2007 a water treatment plant was established. The control room itself was closed in 2005, since then it has been featured in a few well-known films such as the Chernobyl Diaries and World War Z. Other areas of the site remain active through private ownership, with buildings still providing power to Budapest.
       
       
      Our Visit
       
      We arrived in Budapest feeling cautiously optimistic, we had other locations on our agenda for the weekend but Kelenföld was a significant reason for our visit. It's something I've wanted to see since I started exploring a couple of years ago and failure was not an option for us. We had 3 days and therefore 3 attempts (at the minimum) to access it. Fortunately for us, we managed to get in the first time around and we couldn't have really asked for a better way to kick off the trip. 
       
      Once we made it inside the plant we found ourselves lost in a maze of locked doors and sealed off sections. Understandably they wanted to make it as difficult to get into the control room as possible. Whilst searching we heard the familiar sound of nearby footsteps and radio so we quickly found a decent spot to hide. "We have to keep moving, if we stay here we'll get busted," I said to my exploring partner, after a handful of excruciating minutes, listening to them steadily get closer and so we pressed on. Without giving too much away we managed to find our way to the main spectacle and were instantly blown away by it's immense beauty. So without further ado, onto the photos!
       
       
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
      Unfortunately, with the security guard on the hunt for us we decided to bounce before getting caught ((more so my other half than myself.) As much as I would have loved to stay, I didn't argue. Means we have an excuse to go back! 
       
      As always if you've got this far, hope you enjoyed reading my report  
       
       
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