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UK Spring Mills, Huddersfield - July 2018

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The history 

A two-storey mill built in 1831 which resides two miles west of the town centre of Huddersfield. The Financial Reporting Council (FCR) of 1834 shows Armitage Bros already established here. The family name 'Armitage' pre-dates the 14th century, but it was Joseph Armitage (1778-1860) who significantly increased the family fortune and moved decisively into the gentry class. In 1822 he built the first woollen manufacturing mill at Milnsbridge, by the 1840's he handed over control of the business to his sons, who reconstituted it as a partnership called Armitage Bros, which survived until it became a limited company. By 1914 it was part of John Crowther's group. In the late 19th century John Crowther and his two sons moved from Marsden down the Clone Valley to Milnsbridge after purchasing two mills, where they began the successful production of woollen cloth. Crowther took his own life in 1931 and its thought that the death of his wife and the great depression were cumulative in this. Today parts of the mill are rented to a few small business, elsewhere derelict.

 

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The explore

It's not often where in this neck of the woods... but when we are we always take a trip down Factory Lane. We've attempted this a few times... gates drawn, security breathing down our necks or locals asking us our intentions... seems if your walking round an abandoned building your the local scrap man even though your donning DSLR cameras. Anyway... been one of Crowther's we knew we were in for a treat. so.. sitting waiting.. waiting a bit more... we were in. The sheer size, the beautiful architecture, the remains of the mid century furniture... thank f*uck we drove down for a look. It looks like some of the mill buildings have been demolished at some point... but even so this place is huge!!! On entrance we were presented by a grand entrance hall which led into various areas of the mill... Of note was the sheer amount of mid- century furniture scattered around the mill... an entire floor decked with Parkay flooring... and a rather odd looking exercise bike that reminded us of a SinclairsC-5... we even came across a quad bike dumped in one of the corners of the mill. We loved it hear... its full of little gems hidden here and there we spent quite some time at the old mill as where not sure if we will be able to access this again...
 

Some pics

 

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lbe :)

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Good report there, really well covered. That shot of the old lights is really cool.

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You covered this really well & I enjoyed reading up on the history :thumb I like it, theres lots left there with some random machines and textiles etc. Those old signs are pretty cool too. I like the fireplace, looks really clean too. The parquet flooring is looking old but still has such a nice effect not to mention its probably worth a fortune! Well done on this mate :thumb 

 

 

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