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Mine exploring article

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Hi guys, 

 

Hope you're all good! I'm an urban explorer and am writing an article for Vice's new adventure website (it's called Amuse) about mine exploration and what drives people to explore mines. I'm looking to include obviously some real comments from real explorers on what drives them to explore, the best things they've found and on some hot topics, like how they make sure their trips are safe etc.

 

Obviously as it's for the Vice network it's looking to tell the true story of the explorers, so would be cool to hear from anyone who would like to send comments? I'm on [email protected] or send me a message or comment on here and we can chat? 

 

Thanks!

 

Adam

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