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With an ever lasting itch to explore a prison or police station that needed scratching, the time came to explore Brentwood Police Station. Unfortunately solo but a great explore despite!


So after finding a good access point and choosing my moment wisely between passers by, I found myself within the grounds of the police station and soon inside.

The building is mostly stripped out and a bare shell but that wasn’t the main sight to see, I had my mind set on finding the cells! After trying every door it was just my luck they were in the last place I looked.

Attempting the court house adjacent the police station proved unsuccessful.

 

History courtesy of Mockney Reject

 

In December 2015 Police and Crime Commissioner Nick Alston announced that 15 police stations were to be closed to the public in Essex as part of a £63million spending cut. Brentwood Police Station was one of 9 closing completely. He stated that the buildings were buildings were no longer fit for purpose.


“Police officers, not buildings, fight crime,” Chief Constable Stephen Kavanagh said.
“We spend too much on too many police buildings, many of which are either no longer fit for policing or are hardly used by the public to report crime.

Bentwood Police station closed to the public in April 2016, and was vacated in December 2017. Operations have now moved to the local Town Hall. The building was closed as it cost £10million per year in running costs, and would have cost a further £30million in maintenance to bring it up to standard.

Kemsley LLP announced the marketing of Brentwood Police Station for proposed residential development. The site extends to approximately 2.75 acres and a planning application is to be submitted for 70-100 dwellings as part new build, part conversion of existing buildings.

 

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