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  • Similar Content

    • By anthrax
      This is one for the history books, I am really unsure how long this factory will stay how it is. It's one of the best, if not the best spot, that I have ever visited. It looked like there had been some vandalism at first when we entered, but in the upper and other parts of the factory, everything looks so untouched, it's unbelievable. 
       
      Full Album (80 pics): https://flic.kr/s/aHsmAYHLXQ
      IG: @ofcdnb
       
      DSC_4831.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4832.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4833.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4837.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4840.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4846.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4849.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4853.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4862.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4871.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4890.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4893.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4895.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4900.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4918.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4928.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4940.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4941.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4942.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
      DSC_4946.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
       
       
       
       
    • By Benjamin W.
      The office building of the Textima company in east germany was left behind with most of the stuff inside after the wall was fallen.
      Really beautiful to see the natural decay without much of vandalism.
      We couldn't see everything of the building cause the demolishing had already started while we have been inside.
      The only part which was saved is the old Textima logo.
       
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    • By Urbexy
      New member here, but far from new to urbex. I have always had an interest in exploring and adventuring within abandoned locations.
       
      When I explore I take images and video and I upload to my YouTube channel. I notice that there appears to be a fairly sizable rift between Stills photographers and videographers (mainly YouTubers).
       
      As I said before I am a YouTuber but I don't beg for likes and subscriptions. I  research locations, explore it and document it. None of this "smash the like button" or "nearly died" fakery that a lot of video people do simply to generate exposure. I think genuine urban explorers whether they are stills people or video people actually have more in common than they think and Perhaps we should be more worried about outright fakery that occurs on both sides of the spectrum. Within the YouTube urbex community, there is a genuine distaste for people who are creating fake content. The term that is widely used is "urbex theatre". It's a work of fiction, dressed up to be an explore.
       
      The same occurs within the photography sector where people are manipulating images to the extent they do not even resemble the original location. There are also situations where people rearrange locations to set up their shots (photo or video) and this really just takes away from the whole abandoned theme.
       
      Genuine explorers are genuine explorers regardless of the medium you choose to record your explores on, or the platform you choose to display your work. Would love to hear your thoughts on this...
    • By Industrieller
      During the Cold War, this bunker was built as an auxiliary hospital.
      The overlying school was opened in the 60s while the hospital was officially inaugurated in the 80s.
      It offered 2,370 places and never went into operation.
      At the turn of the millennium, it was relieved of its responsibilities, the inventory transferred to other states, and the hospital will be soon demolished.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
    • By Industrieller
      The location combined hotel, bar and cinema.
      The operation was discontinued in the 90's.
      It used to be the meeting place in this small, rural community, today the decay continues incessantly.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

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