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AndyK!

France Florange Steel Works / HFX, France - June 2017

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Great set with fascinating pics again! Although I have visited the Bureau Central repeatedly, I have never been to the steelworks next to it...

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Just got better and better that did ?. Aside from the epic industrial-ness I really like the level of decay in those admin buildings at the beginning :) 

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