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UK Octel Bromine Works, Anglesey - July 2018

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History

This Octel site in Amlwch was chosen in 1949 to collect bromine from the sea, it was picked by H Fossett and R O Gibson because of the strong tidal flow, the depth of the sea in the area and gulf stream sea temperatures. The plant was built and finished construction in 1952, ready to start collecting the bromine out of the sea.

The site was officially owned by Octel until 1989 when the production of bromine chemicals became more important which resulted in Great Lakes purchasing the site due to them specialising in bromine chemistry.

In 1995, one of the BOT2’s that was used for collecting bromine chemicals was badly damaged by a fire that occurred on the site. Two of the 30-metre towers were destroyed and around 5 people were injured.

Octel bromine works started their operations in 1952 and closed in 2004.

Canatxx purchased the site and announced plans to turn the site into a liquid natural gas storage site.

 

Our Visit

This is one site that we have kept our eye on for a while, but never got around to visiting.

Finally, we decided to pay the site a little visit and we were not disappointed with what it had to offer. We made sure to visit on a sunny, bright day so we could spend as much time as we needed to explore the whole site.

It took us a good few hours to explore the whole site but was definitely worth the time and drive there.

 

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Very nice set. The green ceiling and the fern inside on the third and fourth picture are great.

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