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Somewhere in a small french village is these castle located.
Lot of rooms wich a fully furnished and a lot of other stuff are in the rooms.

There are also more then 100 books.

 

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Edited by Industrieller
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Nice place! Only the mason jar on the table looks out of place.

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Bloody hell that's stunning....and thanks for the extra photos! Looks very clean and tidy, maybe too clean for some people but I love it :thumb

 

:comp:

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