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Andy

UK Engedi Chapel / Methodist Church - visited May 2018

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This church was the reason why I wanted to go to Wales during my last trip to the UK. Thanks @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope for visiting this place with me.

 

History (taken from The_Raw)

Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed.

 

The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom.

 

The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair.

 

 

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Ok this is lovely.  And deffo agree looks like the nicest chapel at moment. Next time I'm in wales I may check this out. I've bloody loads in Wales to do lol. And chipping away slowly.  Beutifull shots there matey .

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