Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This time I was actually in vacation with two friends of mine (they aren't explorers), but while we were organising all of our trip we decided to explore this abandoned and untouched printing works (hope that this is a proper name) that I had discovered a few weeks before. Those 2 guys were a couple of graphic designers so they enjoyed the visit even more.

 

This plant used to create mostly the "Action Transfers", which are called "Trasferelli" in Italy: today they are produced mostly on commission and not for business.

 

If you want the complete album, here it is: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmr2nWrm

 

957799559_Abandonedprintingworks-3.jpg.8c0d619f1f873fc8b2b19bc4bed71b59.jpg

 

448305863_Abandonedprintingworks-4.jpg.75302f99356fcd925423d111d9b85d8e.jpg

 

995292324_Abandonedprintingworks-5.jpg.4740d86fdf2d5d8587af451eaddfb7c5.jpg

 

1910413941_Abandonedprintingworks-6.jpg.47e18786c4d58639a7cd164620a4b302.jpg

 

171531770_Abandonedprintingworks-7.jpg.e92fd877e367b3040cb81b5f03e98e82.jpg

 

336855653_Abandonedprintingworks-8.jpg.442c3e0aac05a5da8fab84b33e9c12cd.jpg

 

2080896227_Abandonedprintingworks-11.jpg.eca72d360b968dc27a22810e48221a83.jpg

 

1696068417_Abandonedprintingworks-12.jpg.941c655d4a8fe83d7e3db335eacc945b.jpg

 

332696030_Abandonedprintingworks-14.jpg.f76e66232174f3472df06e0b851c3fa1.jpg

 

694822588_Abandonedprintingworks-17.jpg.a5709526b681efa01e3db22b87391985.jpg

 

1253371702_Abandonedprintingworks-19.jpg.7cb78b11a4ccc6353287491236855a9e.jpg

 

975654022_Abandonedprintingworks-20.jpg.ad542298715f931caf0b0b9d551fdd81.jpg

 

1516907941_Abandonedprintingworks-23.jpg.6e1f16922695fa721eefc757e17c4386.jpg

 

4640690_Abandonedprintingworks-24.jpg.873b5d82516c01d8f103c371b951149d.jpg

 

1249209058_Abandonedprintingworks-25.jpg.da8c6fcbb573486bc7543243d4f8bbce.jpg

 

642719918_Abandonedprintingworks-26.jpg.c47c889d1c2a5c8aea680ab6e7eb224b.jpg

 

Edited by The Urban Tourist
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Thank you all, this was a very nice exploration. My only regret is that since we were a bit in a hurry I couldn't find any paper about the history of this factory: I don't know anything but its name, even the year of closure is unknown to me.

 

 

On 9/4/2018 at 7:34 PM, AndyK! said:

I remember having transfers like that when I was a kid! Nice find

 

Yes, that's what the girl of the group said when she saw them on a table.

 

Edited by The Urban Tourist
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By a World in Ruins
      First a little History [you all know it, but it's good to include anyway] 😃
       
      The Dispensary – the first public hospital in North Staffordshire – opened in Etruria in April 1804 and was funded in part by the Wedgewood family. It gave sick patients the chance to see an Apothecary for diagnosis and treatment. It also provided vaccination against the dreaded smallpox, thanks to the pioneering work of Dr Edward Jenner. Shortly afterwards the 11-bed House of Recovery was opened for fever patients, followed by facilities to treat general and accident patients.
      The hospital continued to expand, due to a steady flow of general illness cases, accidents in the pottery, mining and iron industries and diseases caused by lead and dust. In 1819 it moved to a bigger site in Etruria. By this point it employed a small team of support staff, including a matron and nurses, and ran education programmes urging mine and factory owners to improve their safety standards. Thanks to new ideas about infection control, the building - surrounded by polluting factories - was increasingly seen as unsuitable for patients and was also at risk of collapse from heavy undermining. Eventually, the decision was made to move the infirmary to Hartshill. The clean, quiet suburb became home in 1869 to the North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary, which later merged with the City General Hospital to form the University Hospital of North Staffordshire – now the Royal Stoke University Hospital. Previously the hospital was known as The North Staffordshire Infirmary and Eye Hospital (1815 - 1911) as well as The North Staffordshire Infirmary (1912 - 1926). 
      The building closed down as a medical facility in 2012 as part of the super-hospital development at the Royal Stoke University Hospital.
       
      The explore: Visited with David [ Scrappy ]. It rained, a lot. 😀
      The morgue was a bit of a let down as the slabs had recently been removed and placed in a nearby corridor in front of the fridges. Oh well....
       
      On to the photographs, hope you enjoy:
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By Andy
      I discovered this beautiful cemetery during planning my last trip to Italy this summer. Our accommodation was nearby, so we visited the cemetery.
      In addition to beautiful statues, I also found several old tombs there, which partly seemingly fell into oblivion and are no longer maintained. Fortunately, most of these mausoleums were not locked, so I was able to take pictures inside of them.
       
      History
      The monumental cemetery behind the basilica already existed in the beginning of the 17th century, probably even much earlier. It was redesigned and enlarged by galleries with urn graves in 1870. Today it's considered one of the most beautiful burial places of the region.
      Because its place is limited, older tombs sometimes are  auctioned for a new use. Recently, a grave monument for two persons was sold for 19,000 euros in the summer of 2018.
       
       
      1

       
      2

       
      3

       
      4

       
      5

       
      6

       
      7

       
      8

       
      9

       
      10

       
      11

       
      12

       
      13

       
      14

       
      15

       
      16

       
      17

       
      18

       
      19

       
      20

       
      21

       
      22

       
      23

       
      24

       
      25

       
      26

       
       
       
       
    • By Andy
      This villa with its many wall and ceiling paintings (also named "Villa twins", "Villa Sofa", "Villa F." and so on) has already been known for a long time in the UE scene. Located on a hill above a small villige, access was easy. Unfortunately I don't know when the house was built and when it was abandoned.
      Annoyingly, in the past stupid idiots have damaged and destroyed some things there by vandalism. So, for example, the striped sofa in the entrance hall and the red sofa on the first floor.
       
       
      1

       
      2

       
      3

       
      4

       
      5

       
      6

       
      7

       
      8

       
      9

       
      10

       
      11

       
      12

       
      13

       
      14

       
      15

       
      16

       
      17

       
      18

       
      19

       
      20

       
      21

       
      22

       
      23

       
      24

       
      25

       
       
       
    • By AndyK!
      HMP Holloway was the largest women’s only prison in Europe until its closure in 2016. Rebuilt between 1971 to 1985, the prison's design was intended to produce an atmosphere more like a hospital than a prison. This design was recognised as a failure in the 1980s as its lack of traditional wings or landings, and a maze of corridors, means warders had difficulty monitoring inmates.
       


      Entrance to the rebuilt prison (CC Licence)  
      The history of Holloway dates back to 1852 when the original prison opened as a mixed-sex establishment, but due to the increasing demand for space for female prisoners, it became female-only in 1903. Inmates of the original prison included Oscar Wilde, and more recently Moors murderess Myra Hindley from 1966.
       


      The original Holloway Prison (public domain image)  
      Holding female adults and young offenders either sentenced by the courts or being held on remand, the prison consisted mostly of single cells, but there was also various dormitory accommodation. In January 2016 an inquest into the death of Sarah Reed, a paranoid schizophrenic being held on remand, identified failings in the care system. The prison was closed in July 2016, with plans for it to be sold for housing.
       
      Time to start the unofficial tour....


      Wandering between the modern buildings within the prison grounds 

      Let's head straight into the cells...


      Dorm room


      Single prisoner cell


      Another dorm room


      Mural in one of the many winding corridors


      Twin room


      Lots of peely paint in some places


      There were several styles of cell


       
      Entrance into the prison...


      Prisoner transport vehicles would park inside this area, and the gates closed behind them


      The front entrance leads into this area, with a command room behind the glass


      Corridors lead into the prison


      Each area separated by iron gates

      Prisoner amenities and facilities


      Entrance into the "family friendly" visitor centre.


      Visitors and prisoners could be kept separated in these divided rooms


      The prison had a swimming pool for prisoners to use


      And gym facilities


      The glazed walkway was decorated by inmates


      The prison had a medical ward, including its own opticians


      Pharmacy


      Covered walkway leading to the chapel. Note the high-security walls


      The chapel was large but pretty basic


      More inmate artwork


      Mural inside one of the rooms


      A room for presentations


      The prison's boiler house


      Exterior of the buildings within the prison walls


      High fences divided the exterior areas
×