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teddybear

Belgium HFB september 2018

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probably a well known site. It was more then 4 years ago that i visited this one so a revisit was planned.

On a sunny Sunday I went alone to this site;following the same path as 4 yeas ago,but wanted to see some other parts of this giant plant. Walked there for more than 4 hours and still not seen everything. Unfortunately the metal thieves were also active that day,removing metal ,so sometimes little parts and bolts fell down near the blast furnace. They even used a grinder. Security had a day of I think. (heard that 2 weeks before,some explores were caught here by security). It makes U think.

Again a nice view from the top,and nice place to take a break.When I was up there ,I heard a lot of sirens and fire trucks  coming towards the site,but (un)fortunately) there was a small fire in a home near the site.

 

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30820206498_ab4b9b347e_b.jpgIMG_2238-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr

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44641747212_76a205ed40_b.jpgIMG_2429 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr

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44641746932_2a51fbe186_b.jpgIMG_2432 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr

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44641746682_186959f87b_b.jpgIMG_2442 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr


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44641749532_d30dc60053_b.jpgIMG_2305-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr

Edited by teddybear
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Thanks. But I know for sure I still missed some parts,

The whole plant is coverd in rust but it still felt solid. (I think it's inactive since 2011)

 

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You've probably seen photos from it already but the power station is nice, or was...  I think the metal thieves have really fucked it up now

 

19979277309_283b20143c_b.jpg

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1 hour ago, The_Raw said:

You've probably seen photos from it already but the power station is nice, or was...  I think the metal thieves have really fucked it up now

 

19979277309_283b20143c_b.jpg

This photo makes me sad. I visited specifically for the power station and it had been fucked up so bad that I didn't even bother taking any photos.

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4 minutes ago, AndyK! said:

This photo makes me sad. I visited specifically for the power station and it had been fucked up so bad that I didn't even bother taking any photos.

 

You frequently make me sad with power stations I've not had a chance to see, so in a way I'm glad that you're sad! 😘

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7 minutes ago, The_Raw said:

 

You frequently make me sad with power stations I've not had a chance to see, so in a way I'm glad that you're sad! 😘

 

Erm, thanks? I think! 😊

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