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swoodhall

UK Abandoned Welsh C-House

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Hi Guys,

 

So here it is again, this place must get at least one visit a week now.  But  I had to check it out for myself.  I thought it would be interesting to visit the place all alone,  because of the remoteness. Its still in not bad shape, with no graffiti anywhere yet.  Just a few things seem to have been stolen since 2015, like the famous pocket watches.  Its still a great place to visit, and walk to across the boggy water logged fields.

 

 

 

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54 minutes ago, hamtagger said:

I watched it up until the point you added the sound of a baby crying. Ridiculous

 

Don't be so quick to judge. Maybe they had a baby strapped to their back for the explore?

  • Haha 2

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You could so easily have made that into a half decent report if you hadnt of made it more about the video than the explore.

 

Did you take any stills? i'd be quite interested to see them.

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Thanks for the interest , Yeah this place has been done to death by so many urbexers now, so I wasn't taking my visit to the cloud house too seriously.  It was pretty creeping up there alone though, I would recommend making the trip up there and entering the house alone.    I did took a couple of photos but they aren't the best..  Was gonna chuck the flying camera up too, but it was raining surprise surprise.  

 

Steve

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Some nice shots. I've visited cloud house this year in May, and I especially liked the corner with the organ, the grandfather clock and the painting of the woman.

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Great place. Looks like lots been removed since my visit bout year and half back. The lower floor was full of stuff . And in your vid the old suitcases and boxes are gone. Such a shame. But awesome to see again thanks

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