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Firstly, I don't know if this is the correct place to post this. Secondly, I've discovered an underground access pipe that have evidence of being lived in a long while ago but I'm not sure how to enter. There's no ladder or stair system and those pipes are very dank and dark. I need some advice on how to be able to climb down and also how to navigate as well as what equipment I may need. So far my urbex experience has consisted of above ground structures and I have the necessary equipment for that so that may help in my underground exploring.

Edited by My name is actually Hawk

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Hi there. An access pipe for what? A drain system? If people have been living down there then there must be a fairly straight forward way in. I would suggest looking for access points at ground level, perhaps manhole covers that may reveal a ladder underneath. You will need some kind of drain key to open these which you can usually purchase from a tool store.

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