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Been wanting to get in this place ever since I saw it years ago. These are just a few pictures I took

The Ghajn Tuffieha Military Camp dates back to the late 19th century. By 1910, a formal military camp was in place consisting of timber ’Crimea Huts’ which were later replaced with more permanent masonry replacements, 
Throughout the immediate post-war years up to the late 1960s, the Ghajn Tuffieha Camp represented one of the busiest spots on the island for military training for both British and NATO forces.
In the late 1970s the lower camp was converted into the Hal Ferh tourism accommodation complex. 

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