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lucan

UK Stone Circle, Shropshire 2018

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A small mini stonehenge  . built in about 1850

its about 35 feet  wide with upright pillars with iron fixings to hold it togeather

known localy as the temple

 

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thanks for looking

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Your description of a mini Stonehenge sums that up quite well!  Very interesting. Presumable for some sort of worship?

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7 hours ago, AndyK! said:

Your description of a mini Stonehenge sums that up quite well!  Very interesting. Presumable for some sort of worship?

built as a folly , the landowner at the time had a limestone quarry and its made from local stone

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Looks very interesting, since being on here I'm being shown places fairly local to me I didn't know existed, this is just a 30 min car journey from me ?

Edited by Dale68

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5 hours ago, Dale68 said:

Looks very interesting, since being on here I'm being shown places fairly local to me I didn't know existed, this is just a 30 min car journey from me ?

 

I'm from Shropshire myself and never even heard of this! Very interesting find :)

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thanks all , its alwaays nice to hunt out the unusual little places ,  amazing whats on your doorstep  when you look , follys  i find interesting and came across this while researching

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On 11/11/2018 at 9:14 AM, Dale68 said:

I went last Friday. Nice place for a walk.

 

DJI_0013.JPG

nice drone shot , it looks tiny from up there

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