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Mikeymutt

UK RAF Coltishall..Norfolk.June -August 2018

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I have sat on this one for a fair while.earlier in the year I made quite a lot of trips here trying to find various bits of it.I had been on a visit here years ago and saw some bits,but I knew there was so much more to it.being near to me it was essy to go regularly to check it out.there is security on the site and cameras.so you just have to be a bit careful.Coltishall is now used as an industrial estate with many old buildings in use.it started off as battle of Britain fighter base during the second world war.fighter planes off various sorts were flown from here including hurricanes and spitfires.after the war it was used heavily in the cold war and was designated as a V bomber dispersal site.basically a back up airfield if the aircrafts hme airfield was damaged.the last planes to be based here was the jaguar jets.these saw service in the first gulf war.with the introduction of the euro fighter Coltishall was deemed none essential and so the station closed in 2006.it was a big question what was going to happen to the site.then Norfolk county council stepped in and bought it and this raised a few eyebrows.there track record is not great.

 

SERGEANTS MESS

 

I have visited the officers mess a few times meeting up with pretty vacant and JSP o one time as they visited too.the sergeants mess though is like the officers mess but not so grand.here the NCO's could relax and unwind,there was accommodation provided on the wings and a new block added.

 

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The more modern accommodation blocks.

 

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RECREATION

As usual with the armed forces recreation is a big factor.on coltishall there was a pool,gym and five aside football plus fields for grass sports.sadly the gym is a no go now.

 

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BATTERY MAINTENANCE

This building was for storage off batteries for planes and veichles.jet planes carry some hefty batteries so a place was needed to store them safely,also there was a bit at the front for testing and draining the batteries.it had a morgue feel to it and now known as the battery morgue.

 

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BOMB STORES AND FUEL

A different way in was needed to do these as they are a fair way from the main site.and with CCTV covering the way down I did not want to get caught in the open.like most airfields the bomb stores are located a fair way from the main base for safety.and near to where they would take off.here there was a large building for testing the bombs and making sure they were safe.nearby is the fuel stores.not sure if these were for the planes or not.
 

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Fuelling depot

 

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HANGAR

AS per standard there are four hangars here.several are in use.most of the maintenance work on the planes went on in here.to the sides there is offices and canteen areas.there was seriously nice airmans graffiti in here.

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JET TESTING

With the advancement of jet engines on planes there was a need to test the engines.coltishall had two testing parts,an indoor and an outdoor one.the out door one allowed the planes to back up to the exhaust duct and fire up its engines which would then be passed through the exhaust duct and through the chambers.the test bay is surrounded by thick concrete blast walls.

 

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The indoor one was a similar style to the other.but this was used for engines unattached to the plane.acroos the way is another building,this was were they would repair the engines,they would then be transported to the tester.clamps on a rail would move across and grab the engine.it would then be moved to the exhaust duct for testing.note the array of cameras around the clamping system to monitior the testing process.

 

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The indoor one was a similar style to the other.but this was used for engines unattached to the plane.acroos the way is another building,this was were they would repair the engines,they would then be transported to the tester.clamps on a rail would move across and grab the engine.it would then be moved to the exhaust duct for testing.note the array of cameras around the clamping system to monitior the testing process.

 

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Thank you for looking.I did take lots more photos here but I could be forever on this post .with more smaller buildings.

Edited by Mikeymutt
Duplicate images posted.
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A trip down memory lane for me there Mikey, thanks for posting these up. Been in most of these buildings when they were very much in use :) 

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Great set & report of a really interesting place. I especially like the first and third shots as well as the swimming pool. But also the other pics.

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Wow!

 

What a report. Military stuff isnt usually at the top of my list, but this report is 10/10.

 

Great introduction, story and absolutely belting pictures. Just the right amount of processing, and bloody loads of them without anything being boring.

 

Top effort.

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18 hours ago, hamtagger said:

A trip down memory lane for me there Mikey, thanks for posting these up. Been in most of these buildings when they were very much in use :) 

Thank you mate..I know how caring you are about this place 

13 hours ago, Andy said:

Great set & report of a really interesting place. I especially like the first and third shots as well as the swimming pool. But also the other pics.

Thank you very much Andy 

43 minutes ago, Dubbed Navigator said:

Wow!

 

What a report. Military stuff isnt usually at the top of my list, but this report is 10/10.

 

Great introduction, story and absolutely belting pictures. Just the right amount of processing, and bloody loads of them without anything being boring.

 

Top effort.

Thank you very much.i would not normally do them this long.but after eight visits and hours of walking I felt it deserved a good write up 

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19 hours ago, AndyK! said:

This is fantastic. The place looks awesome, and lots to see, and you've covered it well.

Thank you Andy.very kind of you

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Thats a really comprehensive report mikey, I love the artwork around the place and I've always liked a nice pool. Nice to see somewhere so vast so untouched from the vandals etc. 

Thanks for sharing mate, really enjoyed this :)

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