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Stevepg

Hospital in kashmir

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I went arse over tit when in Kashmir on holiday a couple of years back. A rather informative sign 

D7EAD49B-6107-4DAA-B7FE-F2C64DCA8713.jpeg

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    • By DirtyJigsaw
      Afternoon, 
       
      Thought id upload a report from my visit to Wales in jan just gone. It was a freezing cold day and we had left early hours to get there before the rest of the tourbus turned up
       
      Heres some history from googles...
       
      The population of Cardiff had expanded greatly, from under 20,000 in 1851 to over 40,000 less than 20 years later. By 1890 there were 476 Cardiff residents "boarded out" in the Glamorgan Asylum, and a further 500 to 600 being held in hospitals as far away as Chester and Carmarthen.[2]
      Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam-engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. The site also contained a farm, which provided both food supplies and therapeutic work for the patients.[2]
      The first medical superintendent was Dr Edwin Goodhall, whose then advanced approaches and therapies resulted in the hospital acquiring a reputation at the forefront of mental health care. Patients were also encouraged to take work and supervised tours outside the institute.[2]
      During the First World War, the facility was called the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospital.[3]During the Second World War, part of the hospital was turned over to the military, becoming the largest emergency service hospital in South Wales, treating British, American and German personnel. 200 beds were retained for civilian use, which enabled early treatment of post traumatic stress disorder of military patients.[2]
      On 5 July 1948, the hospital was taken over by the Ministry of Health as the National Health Service came into existence. After the introduction of Care in the Community in the early 1980s the hospital went into a period of decline and the number of resident patients reduced.[2]
      In November 2010 the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board decided that it was preferable to centralise all adult mental health care services at Llandough.[4] The hospital finally closed its doors in April 2016.[5][6]
       
      We had gotten in very easily and during our 6 hours or so there, did come across some other explorers, who had told us they had seen security walking around outside, however, we didnt see anyone at all, even from the top of the water tower we couldnt see anyone, happy days. I have heard of people getting caught here again recently though...
       
      On to some pics
       
      Whitchurch Hospital by
       
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      Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
       
      Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
       
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      Thanks for looking 
       
      DJ
       
       
       
    • By MK17SWL
      Alright, this is my first post on here but I will get right to it. This hospital is trashed beyond belief but was still fun to explore.
      It was shut down in 1992 after the USAF pulled out of George AFB following the end of the cold war. These pictures were taken in December of 2018.

    • By obscureserenity
      Red Cross Hospital
       
       
      Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level,  a common practice for medical facilities Italy, as the air was fresher up in the mountains. It was it was believed that this held medicinal properties and was more therapeutic which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients.
       
      Visited with @aWorldinRuins and @Ninja Kitten on a recent trip to Italy. This was the first stop on the tour and a revisit for myself. I was glad to go back, it's a very beautiful and photogenic location, in my opinion. I loved seeing all the beds, the chapel and the little classrooms again. As always, hope you enjoy my report!
       
       



       

       

       

       



       

       

       

       
       
       
       
      If you've got this far, thanks for reading 
    • By obscureserenity
      Red Morgue Hospital
       
       
      I couldn't find huge amount history on this location but from what I've gathered the hospital was built at some point in the early 20th century. It was funded by investors and at a time when nursing care was predominately carried out by the clergy. They wanted the hospital to become more secular in order to distance themselves from the church. The hospital was mainly used for surgery and featured several operating theatres but later on a maternity ward and outpatient clinic was introduced. About 90 years later the orginal hospital building was combined with a larger nearby hospital. The Red Morgue hospital was eventually closed around 2013. By this time it was only used to see outpatients, as most of it's services were provided by the new hospital which was more modern and sophisticated. 
       
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
       
    • By The_Raw
      The hospital first opened in October 1889 as the Free Hospital for Women and Children. In 1903 children ceased to be treated and in 1904 it became the Samaritan Free Hospital for Women. It had 88 beds in two sections; the surgical side with 11 wards of two beds each and 3 larger convalescent wards, and the medical side with 5 wards and a smaller one used as a theatre. By the beginning of the 20th century the Samaritan Free Hospital, despite its small size, had become one of the country's most important gynaecological hospitals. During WW2 the Hospital joined the Emergency Medical Service with 103 beds. In 1948 the Hospital joined the National Health Service, becoming affiliated with St Mary's Hospital. It was renamed the Samaritan Hospital for Women and served under the NHS until its closure in 1997. 
       
      Abandoned for over twenty years and with a lush exterior it's a shame there isn't more to see in here but it's still pretty interesting. A nice tiled staircase is the only redeeming architectural feature but it's nice enough to give the building some charm. The canteen is still recognisable but most rooms have been cleared out. The most interesting artefacts are down in the basement. There is a box of what are presumably human bones that was hidden in a forgotten incineration bag. A spinal column casually sitting on a shelf in the stationary room, and paperwork dating back as far as the 1930s. Worth mentioning that it is completely riddled with exposed asbestos piping down there. Do we care? Nah. Probably should though!
       







       









       
               


       
               




       



       





       





       
      Thanks for looking
       
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