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Andy

Italy Vecchia scuola con globo (visited 07/2018)

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I already visited this former school in Italy last summer.

 

I don't know if the rumor is true; but I heard that the globe is not original. Allegedly, the previously existing globe was stolen. Then, so is said, a photographer brought another globe and put it there. But as I said, I don't know if this story is true.

Anyway, there were other beautiful things in this school along with old maps.

 

Mostly you can only see photos of the one classroom with the globe online. That's why it was important for me to photograph and show other rooms from there as well.

 

 

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Crazy story with the globe. Nice to see more from this place than only the classroom and the bedroom. Ehhm where is the bedroom? 

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On 1/28/2019 at 4:19 PM, Benjamin W. said:

Ehhm where is the bedroom? 

 

Um, I think I've been in other rooms for so long that I finally missed the bedroom. Well, not so bad. It's only one old small bedroom, like many others.  It was more important for me, also to show some other rooms, too, that you usually don't get to see online.

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23 minutes ago, jones-y-gog said:

Looks like a beautiful building, from the inside at least! 

 

Thanks! From the outside, the building was indeed rather boring and unadorned. You hardly would have expected from the outside that inside are still so beautiful rooms.

Our hobby shows again and again: Don't judge a book by its cover. ;) 

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This place is high on my to do list for 2019 and seeing this report makes me want to go even more! Fantastic photographs and very well covered as always @Andy. An interesting story regarding the globe as well, I'd heard it had been stolen and was a bit disappointed. I've seen a lot of pictures recently with the globe in it so it would make sense it has been replaced, glad to see there's still some good people left in the community! 

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