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Closed due to two local schools merging  and getting a newly built school to move into 

Planning permission has been given to demolish the site and build houses

Visited with the elusive , and thanks for the tipoff K

On with the snaps

 

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thanks for looking

 

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Nice place with interesting things inside. I like the gym, the murals and the older photos there.

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I went here a couple of months ago (need to get the report up)

 

Loved the artwork in the hall, and you seem to have got into a couple of places we didn't. Was the electric still running?

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  • Similar Content

    • By TrevBish.co.uk
      Hi all! Not sure on the history of this place but its been around a while. Not a bad place. Not that exciting but we were passing so thought we would have a mooch! A couple of nice cars. 
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

       
       
       
       

    • By Hooismans
      History:
      The origins of the most famous coke plant in the city of Charleroi dates back to 1838, when a coke-fired blast furnace was established along the river Sambre by the newborn company Société Anonyme des Laminoirs, Forges, Fonderies et Usines de la Providence (shorten Forges de la Providence). Although coke ovens were present on site since the beginning, a first modern coke plant was established in 1908 to support the three existing blast furnaces. At the time, the Providence steelworks were amongst the largest in the Charleroi region and whole Belgium too. This favorable positioning was confirmed and improved after a general restructuring occurred between the two world wars. The first phase (1918-21) consisted in the replacement of ancient blast furnaces with five new ones: two at Marchienne and three more at Dampremy. The resulting expanded site was stretching for about 2 km between the Sambre (south) and the Bruxelles-Charleroi canal (north).
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    • By Gromr123
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      We were doing really well until we set off some PIR alarms in one of the outbuildings while we were leaving. Whoops!
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      The Photos
       
      Externals
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Internals
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      ]
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      The clock tower mechanism which still could be operated.
       

       

       

      The Basement level. Most the lights worked!
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

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