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Lenston

UK Whitchurch Hospital - 35mm BW Film - Jan 2019

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We all know the history of this place and with so many reports going up recently but here is a short version.

 

Inspired by Tumbles i decided to shoot some old BW Film.

 

History

 

Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s.

Whitchurch Hospital finally closed its doors in April, 2016 and is due to be stripped down and dismantled.

 

 

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Thanks for looking

 

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10 hours ago, The_Raw said:

Some great pics there mate. Need to get myself a film camera some time

Thanks mate, makes you think a bit more about the images for sure. 

12 minutes ago, obscureserenity said:

Lovely shots! They came out really well. Prefer your film shots to any of the digital ones I've seen. What film are you using out of interest? :) 

Thanks :) Shot with a roll of Kodak Tmax 400. 

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2 minutes ago, Lenston said:

Thanks mate, makes you think a bit more about the images for sure. 

Thanks :) Shot with a roll of Kodak Tmax 400. 

No worries :) Nice! I've been using Ilford 125 but I might have to try that one next.

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1 minute ago, obscureserenity said:

No worries :) Nice! I've been using Ilford 125 but I might have to try that one next.

Quite a bit of noise but they seem to have come out ok, not done it for years so just trying a bunch of different film, I have some HP5 which i will probably try on the next one.

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11 hours ago, hamtagger said:

Looks great in BW :). Gonna be the next severalls this place if they don't do something with it soon

Thanks Trev, you wont believe the state of the place now. 

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Thats really nice mate, think the black and white really captures the place as it should be. Really surprised how much this has gone downhill ? Such a shame. Corridor shots are awesome :) 

 

:comp:

 

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2 hours ago, Urbexbandoned said:

Thats really nice mate, think the black and white really captures the place as it should be. Really surprised how much this has gone downhill ? Such a shame. Corridor shots are awesome :) 

 

:comp:

 

Thanks Tracey :)

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40 minutes ago, jones-y-gog said:

Really ace shots. I think it's difficult to capture these sorts of locations in b+w but you've nailed it here. 

Thanks mate 

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Nice to see some classic photos again. Looks very good in black and white.

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7 hours ago, Andy said:

Nice to see some classic photos again. Looks very good in black and white.

Cheers Andy, hope all is well with you.

4 hours ago, Dubbed Navigator said:

Right up my alley this, love it. Nice one.

Thanks mate 

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