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AndyK!

UK Bowmans Flour / Whitley Bridge Mill, Eggborough - February 2019

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Whitley Bridge Mill was originally built in 1870s by John and Thomas Croysdale. Powered by electricity and steam, the mill utilised roller milling, a technique that had revolutionised the flour industry. For more than 100 years the mill was owned by James Bowman & Sons Ltd. Bowmans ceased operations at the mill in 2016 after making the decision to move away from flour milling, and the mill was subsequently closed.

 

Much of the machinery and equipment had been sold at auction, and extensive damaged caused to the building during the removal of the equipment. However enough remained to make this an interesting visit. The building is like a maze, and we kept find more and more bits every time we thought we'd covered the entire place. Visited with @The Amateur Wanderer.

 

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Archive image of the mill

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The mill as it stands today

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Autoroller roller mills

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More roller mills

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The roller mills were the main machinery in the flour milling process

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One of the few remaining original windows, although now with a metal sheet covering

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The laboratory was quite interesting

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Note the Bowmans logo used to form a pattern in the tiles

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Rear exterior and silos

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Fuel pumps
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27 minutes ago, Mikeymutt said:

I like that a lot Andy.still lots to see 

Thanks Mikey, yeah a lot had gone, but still plenty left too

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I always like to look at your photos. You simply have a good view for appropriate positions, to capture the places very well. And I also like your balanced way of editing - without exaggerated HDR or unnecessary effects, but successful shots with sharpness and great colors. :) 

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Cooor, that is lovely.  I did try it a while ago and failed.  I will get back here for absolute sure 

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