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Beneficial-Cucumber

USA Abandoned Blast Furnace Bridge - PA

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That's not how it works I'm afraid, we need the images to be added into the report with a bit of history if available please, along with the month and year visited in the title.

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Got some great photos there, would it be possible to compile them into a report as @AndyK! has suggested? We have a few technical guides to assist you with this. You can post via Flickr or upload your images directly onto the forum. If you have any issues or queries, please let us know. 

 

https://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/information/technical-help/

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