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I have never been happy with the results of my expolration but nevertheless it was one of my absolute favorites. This outstanding piece of Brutalism architecture placed in the phenomenal surrounding of the beautiful historical city. PORN!

 

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Fantastic brutalist architecture, and so many seats!

(Don't forget to add the month/year visited to the title, cheers)

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Looks great with the lots of red seats & chairs.

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Am 8.3.2019 um 11:19 schrieb AndyK!:

Fantastic brutalist architecture, and so many seats!

(Don't forget to add the month/year visited to the title, cheers)

Is there a way to add date afterwards? I visited the congress in 10/2016.

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On 3/11/2019 at 12:33 AM, Ghost-Scooter said:

Is there a way to add date afterwards? I visited the congress in 10/2016.

 

Cheers, I've edited the title for you. Looks like a great location for a party :D

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vor 11 Stunden schrieb The_Raw:

 

Cheers, I've edited the title for you. Looks like a great location for a party :D

Thanks.

 

Pls make sure you wear rubber boots for the party. The floor is completely wet. Unfortunately  seats disappeared meanwhile. 

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      OPD by
       
      OPD by
       
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      OPD by
       
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    • By DirtyJigsaw
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      Hayward by
       
      Hayward by
       
      Hayward by
       
      Hayward by
       
      Hayward by
       
      Hayward by
       
      Hayward by
       
      Hayward by
       
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