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Germany Shooting Range of the German Wehrmacht Oct. '18

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In the middle of the woods, they appear all of a sudden: giant walls and ruins as well as holes hidden beneath branchwood and covered by foliage - the remnants of an old shooting range of the German Wehrmacht (the armed forces of Nazi-Germany). Even the soil itself is still cotaminated by bullets and casings. The remains can be identified as ammunition from the Wehrmacht as well as from the Bundeswehr and the US-Army, which prove that all of these three armies used the area for their shooting exercises.

Unfortunately, I haven´t come across confirmed historical sources concerning the former shooting range, but it seems to be obvious that the area was a shooting range built by the Wehrmacht. Not confirmed sources indicate that the US-Americans blasted the buildings after World War II. After the destruction the area was apparently still used for military exercises on occasion. 

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Am 17.3.2019 um 13:48 schrieb The_Raw:

Very interesting. Where does the entrance lead to?

Thank you very much. It was like a small bunker, only one room. Maybe it was used as storage for ammunition, but I have no clue to be honest. 

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Looks interesting. I like the natures green & red colors.

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