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    • By jane doe
      The school occupies what used to be the Lillesden Estate Mansion, built at the estate (south of Hawkhurst) in 1855 by the banker Edward Loyd, who moved there after marrying. The house and estate remained in the family until just after the First World War, when it was then sold and eventually became the Bedgebury Girls Public School. The school closed in 1999







    • By btn_urbex
      HISTORY
      Tenterden Town railway station is a heritage railway station on the Kent and East Sussex Railway in Tenterden, Kent, England.
       
      When the railway line first opened in 1900, Rolvenden Station was known as "Tenterden". Its name was changed when the line extended north three years later and a station closer to Tenterden was constructed. The new Tenterden Town station opened on 16 March 1903.The line closed for regular passenger services on 4 January 1954 and all traffic in 1961. It reopened on 3 February 1974 under the aegis of the Tenterden Railway Company which bought the line between Tenterden and Bodiam. The station now houses the KESR's Carriage and Wagon works, and the Colonel Stephens Museum is located nearby.
       
      EXPLORE
      So we set out on our explore with a list of places We wanted to check out. After a few not amounting to much and the next couple being total fails, we parked up and regrouped! 
      The  Tenterden site had been on my radar for a while (although I couldn’t be 100% about it’s location) so after a little discussion we decided to take a chance and head out to try and find the Lost Railway and its Train Graveyard.
      We headed toward the closest point by road, parked up and set off along a short path way. The area was really quiet apart from the odd dog walker.  After literally five minutes we knew we were in the right place and could see the abandoned trains hidden amongst the trees.  Access was easy literally a small hop over the fence and down the bank, there they were! 
      Its the first time any of us had ever done an explore of this nature and it was amazing... 
      Anyway here are some of the pictures we took throughout the explore.
      Thanks for reading 😊



























    • By JohnnyThunderdrone
      Hi fellas, a country house with many curious things to see, i hope you enjoy :
       
    • By jane doe
      Another old explore ...a little gem in Kent   








    • By silverainbow
      Well guys, this has been covered on more than one occasion, and I've visited this site on more than one of the numerous open days over previous years never been lucky enough to get any Pics due to the hoards of people all over the place, So when one very kind Barry Stewart offered me free reign of the place for a few hours obviously I happily and very gratefully took him up on his offer.
      So, For a bit of History ;
      The Drop Redoubt is one of the two forts on Western Heights, and is linked to the other, the Citadel, by a series of dry moats (the lines). It is, arguably, the most impressive and immediately noticeable feature on Dover’s Western Heights.
      The artillery at the Redoubt faced mostly inland; it was intended to attack an invading force attempting to capture Dover from the rear.
      The construction of the Redoubt was in two periods: the first being from 1804-1808 during the Napoleonic Wars, and the second from 1859-1864 following the recommendations of the 1859 Royal Commission.

      Well, That's all folks, Thanks for taking a look

      More can be found out about this fantastic Structure Here;
       
       
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