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superwide

UK Snowdown colliery, Kent 29/11/08

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Me and my brother, littlewide had a really nice explore this morning onto the site of the now closed Snowdown colliery. Loads of building left standing easy access into most of them, this is the deepest mine in Kent at 3000m at its lowest point, apparently at that depth the rock is hot.

We started having a nose around in a couple of the larger building, there are loads of bits and pieces laying around everything from cranes to miners boots. In the admin building there are contracts of employment laying every where dating from around 1930 until the mid 80's.

There is one small problem.....security, as we came out from the back of the building marked "opening" we saw them pull up, so after a hasty and covert move away to the slag heap we made our way back toward the buildings on the left, then more security pulled onto the site so we decided to make an exit and plan our next visit a little better.

Sorry about the pic's my Box brownie is shagged and then half way round the battery's also died. Not sure what all the cloud effects are....maybe the ghosts of past miners. :o

I will add some notes to the pics later. Bit short on time at the mo.

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It's an often overlooked place this is.

You should have gone and had a chat with the security, when I visited it about a year ago they were absolutely fine with us being there taking photos, although they did ask us not to go into any of the buildings. We had a good long chat with them about the future of the place while we were there as well.

Interesting to hear that you can get into the buildings again. When I last visited, they had been grilled up good and proper with really strong steel grills making access to most of them impossible, so the local chav population must have been busy again I guess! The first time I visited, most of them were wide open you literally could just wonder into them.

Looks like you got into a few places that we didn't at the time, so a re-visit with my better camera may just be in order!

Maniac.

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