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Oil Mills West - Dover 27.12.08

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Visited with Mitch, Swamp Donkey, Maniac and Scrimshady

Epic access!!!! funniest thing I've ever seen, sorry bout the dents in the roof of your car Maniac.

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Great to see this place again, and well played mitch for getting in :D

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    • By bob
      An oil refinery being decommissioned... I went there with my bicycle, managed to get it past the first fence which was nice xD
       
      I hope i didn't put too many photos...
       
      D90 with sigma 17-70
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
       
      cheers

    • By silverainbow
      Well guys, this has been covered on more than one occasion, and I've visited this site on more than one of the numerous open days over previous years never been lucky enough to get any Pics due to the hoards of people all over the place, So when one very kind Barry Stewart offered me free reign of the place for a few hours obviously I happily and very gratefully took him up on his offer.
      So, For a bit of History ;
      The Drop Redoubt is one of the two forts on Western Heights, and is linked to the other, the Citadel, by a series of dry moats (the lines). It is, arguably, the most impressive and immediately noticeable feature on Dover’s Western Heights.
      The artillery at the Redoubt faced mostly inland; it was intended to attack an invading force attempting to capture Dover from the rear.
      The construction of the Redoubt was in two periods: the first being from 1804-1808 during the Napoleonic Wars, and the second from 1859-1864 following the recommendations of the 1859 Royal Commission.

      Well, That's all folks, Thanks for taking a look

      More can be found out about this fantastic Structure Here;
       
       
    • By oldskool
      For those that know me will know i hate mills, i think there boring but as my urbex partner in crime loves them i find myself frequenting them often ....ok mill f was abit of a fail a very long drive to find NO access so we hit the smaller version across the way .
      Still holding some original features and some excellent light ....i must admit it was pretty photographic .....all reet on wit pics...visted with Mr.Host
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      Ok few hours past time to drive back up north .....now still being early we decided to pay a re-visit to Mill Delph .......now we explored this mill over 2 years ago but i saw some photos from Zero81 on the net and asked him were they were from he told me mill delph,i was like no there not we didnt see that when we were there ....but to my knowledge two years ago that part was locked (we only missed the best part ....go figure) the first few pics are from 2 years ago the machinery is from this week .....
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      No light in the basement .....
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      Cheers for looking ...........Oldskool
       
    • By oldskool
      A really nice mill with a little hidden jem.The workshop is like a time capsule worth the trip just to see this, a little history....

      Dalton Mills was once the largest textile mill in the region, employing over 2000 workers. It was built by Joseph Craven in 1869, replacing the original mill which was owned by Rachel Leach in the 1780's.
      The mill was named Dalton Mills after the manager employed by Rachel Leach, a man called Dalton.
      In its heyday between 1869 and 1877 the mill provided jobs for workers all over Keighley and the Worth Valley.
      As the textile industry declined, the fortunes of Dalton Mills changed and up until 2004, it had been virtually empty for almost a decade. John Craven, the great-great grandson of Joseph, who had built the mill, eventually chose to sell Dalton Mills to Magna Holdings, to ensure it’s survival.
      Part of the renovation of the Clock Tower has included restarting the landmark clock which has not ticked for 25 years. In the mill's heyday, thousands of workers relied on the clock to get to work on time, but the hands had not moved for a quarter of a century. Last year Magna Holdings repaired the clock, and illuminated the faces, so it can display the time to the whole of Dalton Lane again.









      Swoooooooosh.......



      Smurf Surf.........





      Thanks for looking Oldskool....

    • By chris banks
      I have found a location close to me in West Yorkshire that has been covered before, the site is nearly completely destroyed but the main barn and some of the out buildings still exist. 
      I enjoyed looking around the site and turning it into a cinematic style video (i hope i aren't hated for it, my last video i posted on here went down well).
       
      Let me know what you think of the video.
       
       
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