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    • By AndyK!
      Visited with @The_Raw, @Pinkman, @Maniac and @extreme_ironing.
       
      History
      The Brent oil field, off the north-east coast of Scotland is one of the largest fields in the North Sea. Discovered in 1971, it was one of the most significant oil and gas finds made in the UK sector. Brent field production peaked in 1982 when over half a million barrels of oil and 26 million cubic meters of gas were produced… every day!
       
      The Brent oil field was served by four large platforms owned by Shell – Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta. Each platform has a ‘topside’ which is visible above the waterline and houses the accommodation block, helipad, as well as drilling and other operational areas. The topsides sit on much taller supporting structures, or ‘legs’, which stand in 140 metres of water and serve to anchor the topsides to the sea bed.
       
      By 1976 Brent Bravo had started production, and later that year the second platform, Brent Delta was installed, which started production in 1977. Delta weighed 24,000 tonnes (the same as 2,000 London busses!) and the platform alone was as tall as the London Eye.
       
      The Brent field has reached the stage where production is no longer economically viable and decommissioning is underway. In 2011 Brent Delta stopped production. After 5 years of planning and 2 years of preparations, the entire Brent Delta platform was cut free from its supporting legs and brought ashore in one piece, where it will be dismantled and scrapped.
       

      Brent Delta Platform after being brought ashore in Hartlepool


      On the helipad


      View across the deck with the derrick and flare stack towering above


      More detailed view of the topdeck, where drilling activities were carried out


      View across the deck


      View in the other direction towards the crane


      Derrick and flare stack


      On the top deck where the drilling happened


      Hook and winch equipment


      The “doghouse” where drilling operations were controlled


      Heading below deck we find a workshop


      And various plant rooms




      There were various rooms for deployment of workers




      Sick bay


      The workers accommodation was pretty basic


      Central control room




      The engine room was tucked away below the accommodation block




      One of the emergency lifeboats


      Sign on the side of the platform
    • By bob
      An oil refinery being decommissioned... I went there with my bicycle, managed to get it past the first fence which was nice xD
       
      I hope i didn't put too many photos...
       
      D90 with sigma 17-70
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
       
      cheers

    • By silverainbow
      Well guys, this has been covered on more than one occasion, and I've visited this site on more than one of the numerous open days over previous years never been lucky enough to get any Pics due to the hoards of people all over the place, So when one very kind Barry Stewart offered me free reign of the place for a few hours obviously I happily and very gratefully took him up on his offer.
      So, For a bit of History ;
      The Drop Redoubt is one of the two forts on Western Heights, and is linked to the other, the Citadel, by a series of dry moats (the lines). It is, arguably, the most impressive and immediately noticeable feature on Dover’s Western Heights.
      The artillery at the Redoubt faced mostly inland; it was intended to attack an invading force attempting to capture Dover from the rear.
      The construction of the Redoubt was in two periods: the first being from 1804-1808 during the Napoleonic Wars, and the second from 1859-1864 following the recommendations of the 1859 Royal Commission.

      Well, That's all folks, Thanks for taking a look

      More can be found out about this fantastic Structure Here;
       
       
    • By oldskool
      For those that know me will know i hate mills, i think there boring but as my urbex partner in crime loves them i find myself frequenting them often ....ok mill f was abit of a fail a very long drive to find NO access so we hit the smaller version across the way .
      Still holding some original features and some excellent light ....i must admit it was pretty photographic .....all reet on wit pics...visted with Mr.Host
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      Ok few hours past time to drive back up north .....now still being early we decided to pay a re-visit to Mill Delph .......now we explored this mill over 2 years ago but i saw some photos from Zero81 on the net and asked him were they were from he told me mill delph,i was like no there not we didnt see that when we were there ....but to my knowledge two years ago that part was locked (we only missed the best part ....go figure) the first few pics are from 2 years ago the machinery is from this week .....
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      No light in the basement .....
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      Cheers for looking ...........Oldskool
       
    • By oldskool
      A really nice mill with a little hidden jem.The workshop is like a time capsule worth the trip just to see this, a little history....

      Dalton Mills was once the largest textile mill in the region, employing over 2000 workers. It was built by Joseph Craven in 1869, replacing the original mill which was owned by Rachel Leach in the 1780's.
      The mill was named Dalton Mills after the manager employed by Rachel Leach, a man called Dalton.
      In its heyday between 1869 and 1877 the mill provided jobs for workers all over Keighley and the Worth Valley.
      As the textile industry declined, the fortunes of Dalton Mills changed and up until 2004, it had been virtually empty for almost a decade. John Craven, the great-great grandson of Joseph, who had built the mill, eventually chose to sell Dalton Mills to Magna Holdings, to ensure it’s survival.
      Part of the renovation of the Clock Tower has included restarting the landmark clock which has not ticked for 25 years. In the mill's heyday, thousands of workers relied on the clock to get to work on time, but the hands had not moved for a quarter of a century. Last year Magna Holdings repaired the clock, and illuminated the faces, so it can display the time to the whole of Dalton Lane again.









      Swoooooooosh.......



      Smurf Surf.........





      Thanks for looking Oldskool....

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