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    • By Flava
      Stopped off here on the way back from a Birmingham day trip what a stunning site and well worth the detour hope you enjoy the photos
      Tone Mill in Wellington is the last woollen mill in the West Country, with a priceless collection of original machinery still in place in the wet finishing works. The site is of European significance.
      The Prince's Regeneration Trust created The Tone Mill Partnership drawing together local people with an active interest in finding a sympathetic and economically viable new use for the site. Together we are continuing to develop plans that will restore the Grade II* listed woollen mill buildings as a working mill that can also be visited by the public.
      Tone Mill is a listed group of industrial buildings that date from the 18th and 19th Centuries. The site played an important role in the cloth industry in Wellington until the late 20th Century, here the woven cloth was dyed and finished and there is an exceptional amount of surviving machinery that illustrates the way the buildings were used and how the manufacturing process worked. There is no better or more intact example in England of a traditional wet-finishing works.
      Conservation and reuse of these important historic buildings will bring new jobs to Wellington and will provide an exciting visitor attraction. The mill buildings are redundant and at risk and are now the subject of a planning application for conversion. Our project would enable a long-established local business to return to the site and operate the machinery in the traditional way. The Partnership commissioned an Options Appraisal that has evaluated potential heritage-led uses which include providing public access. The Prince's Regeneration Trust continues to work with The Partnership towards its aim of acquiring the site and is optimistic that a successful heritage project can be delivered.

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

    • By seaside_rambler
      We popped in here over the summer for the first time, quite liked it here, nice and peaceful...until I heard someone outside with their lad, peeped out the access hole to see none other that our own Silverainbow
      Was a busy day, as a poor badger had found his way in, but sadly not his way out. This place was to be his last explore.. So here is part of one of many Napoleonic War defences along this stretch of coastline, all with fascinating histories including WWI&II. Some info can be found here
      Anyway, got a few pics but forgot to snap Mr Badger! He did smell a bit fresh so didn't want to hang around him too long..








    • By seaside_rambler
      The Coryton Fuel Oil Refinery was built in 1953 by the Vacuum Oil Company and is situated on the Essex coast on the Thames Estuary. It was jointly run by BP and Mobil until in 1996 when BP took sole ownership. In 2007 it was transferred to Petroplus Holdings.

      Major products included petrol and diesel, fuel oils, bitumen and aviation fuels. The refining capacity was 22,000 barrels per day. Most products were distributed in the south east UK.
      Petroplus filed for bankruptcy in 2012 and production ceased in June of that year. In February 2013 the gas supply was shut off ending 60 years of operations here at Coryton.

      So after a tip off from that lovely chap @The_Raw, one fine sunny morning @Obscurity, @urbanginger and I decided to go have a look - the power station being the main goal of the day, opened in 2002 and producing 73 MW of gas fired power. After negotiating the access it seemed a little quiet. Great. Off we went in search of the power station building. 


       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Saw one car go past while inside but all was chilled and we got a few shots before heading up to the roof for a smoke and food break and to check the site out. 


       



       


      Few other things as we made our way out, having to hide from the odd security patrols




       
      @Obscurity eyeing up the prize, I gave that one a miss after only making it halfway up 



      After they got their shots up there we made a sneaky escape, got coffee and went home! Good day out that was 

       
    • By AndyK!
      Visited with @The_Raw, @Pinkman, @Maniac and @extreme_ironing.
       
      History
      The Brent oil field, off the north-east coast of Scotland is one of the largest fields in the North Sea. Discovered in 1971, it was one of the most significant oil and gas finds made in the UK sector. Brent field production peaked in 1982 when over half a million barrels of oil and 26 million cubic meters of gas were produced… every day!
       
      The Brent oil field was served by four large platforms owned by Shell – Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta. Each platform has a ‘topside’ which is visible above the waterline and houses the accommodation block, helipad, as well as drilling and other operational areas. The topsides sit on much taller supporting structures, or ‘legs’, which stand in 140 metres of water and serve to anchor the topsides to the sea bed.
       
      By 1976 Brent Bravo had started production, and later that year the second platform, Brent Delta was installed, which started production in 1977. Delta weighed 24,000 tonnes (the same as 2,000 London busses!) and the platform alone was as tall as the London Eye.
       
      The Brent field has reached the stage where production is no longer economically viable and decommissioning is underway. In 2011 Brent Delta stopped production. After 5 years of planning and 2 years of preparations, the entire Brent Delta platform was cut free from its supporting legs and brought ashore in one piece, where it will be dismantled and scrapped.
       

      Brent Delta Platform after being brought ashore in Hartlepool


      On the helipad


      View across the deck with the derrick and flare stack towering above


      More detailed view of the topdeck, where drilling activities were carried out


      View across the deck


      View in the other direction towards the crane


      Derrick and flare stack


      On the top deck where the drilling happened


      Hook and winch equipment


      The “doghouse” where drilling operations were controlled


      Heading below deck we find a workshop


      And various plant rooms




      There were various rooms for deployment of workers




      Sick bay


      The workers accommodation was pretty basic


      Central control room




      The engine room was tucked away below the accommodation block




      One of the emergency lifeboats


      Sign on the side of the platform
    • By bob
      An oil refinery being decommissioned... I went there with my bicycle, managed to get it past the first fence which was nice xD
       
      I hope i didn't put too many photos...
       
      D90 with sigma 17-70
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
       
      cheers

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