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vanishing days

Deep Shelter - dover - kent - 2008

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Looks like number 2, I lost my underground exploration virginity in there haha, I was shit scared for about the first 5 minutes then realised it wasn't actually that scary haha :lol:

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Looks like number 2, I lost my underground exploration virginity in there haha, I was shit scared for about the first 5 minutes then realised it wasn't actually that scary haha :lol:

Look at Dazzers Avatar pic, that was taken in that shelter. We use it a lot for experimental photography because it's so accessible. shame there's been a recent fire and the place stinks now, or at least it did when we last visited.

M

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ahh yes, I definitely do, if its the one involving a Bee, that I keep hearing mention but never actually fully heard :lol:

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well we went down i was happy taking pictures then all of the sudden bbbbbbbbzzzzzzzzzzzzz bbbbbbbbbbbbzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz im gona get ya enter one pissed of bee that dive bombed solar p and then chased him a round for 10 mins while he screams like a girl mwhahahahaahaa

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  • Similar Content

    • By jane doe
      Another old explore ...a little gem in Kent   








    • By SouthCoastUrbex
      Hi all,
       
      We went and visited a WW2 Shelter last night on the outskirts of London. The place was absolutely incredible and even had left behind remnants. We found it that it had been unsealed again so we decided to set off straight away as we did not want to miss this chance. I hope you enjoy the video!
       
      HISTORY:
       
      I couldn't find to much however the shelter was built on the grounds of Cane Hill Asylum around the time of WW2. There were also another 3 tunnels built at the same time. Sometime after the war the tunnels were bought by a specialist manufacture of optical devices which included mainly lenses for large telescopes. The Company left the site in the early 70s to then go on and finish trade in 1978. It basically then turned into a tipping site for old car parts until they were sealed up by the local council.
       
       
       
    • By silverainbow
      Well guys, this has been covered on more than one occasion, and I've visited this site on more than one of the numerous open days over previous years never been lucky enough to get any Pics due to the hoards of people all over the place, So when one very kind Barry Stewart offered me free reign of the place for a few hours obviously I happily and very gratefully took him up on his offer.
      So, For a bit of History ;
      The Drop Redoubt is one of the two forts on Western Heights, and is linked to the other, the Citadel, by a series of dry moats (the lines). It is, arguably, the most impressive and immediately noticeable feature on Dover’s Western Heights.
      The artillery at the Redoubt faced mostly inland; it was intended to attack an invading force attempting to capture Dover from the rear.
      The construction of the Redoubt was in two periods: the first being from 1804-1808 during the Napoleonic Wars, and the second from 1859-1864 following the recommendations of the 1859 Royal Commission.

      Well, That's all folks, Thanks for taking a look

      More can be found out about this fantastic Structure Here;
       
       
    • By WildBoyz
      History

      W. T. Henley was a cable/wire company that was founded in a small London-based workshop in 1837. William Thomas Henley is famous for having converted his old lathe into a wiring covering machine which was used to cover wire with silk and cotton as this was in high demand at the time for electromagnetic apparatus. It is reported that Henley’s company progressed at an impressive rate and that he pioneered the submarine cable field (laying cables on the sea bed between land-based stations to carry telecommunication signals across stretches of ocean).It was Henley’s dream that all of civilisation would eventually be linked together telegraphically. 

      As WT Henley’s Telegraph Works continued to prosper, Henley decided to purchase a factory at North Woolwich beside the Thames in 1859 for £8,000. It is said that this development led to the laying of the Persian Gulf telegraph cable which is 1615 miles long, for the Indian Government. As a result, by the end of 1873 Henley’s Woolwich site had spread to cover some sixteen acres and his company also included three cable laying ships and a four-hundred-foot wharf to allow five-hundred-ton ships to load and unload their cargo. Sadly, Henley died in 1882; however, his company continued to grow in his absence and went on to form branches across the country. 

      By 1906 work on a new factory in Gravesend was completed. The new factory is said to have been an impressive development and it included extensive, purpose-built, laboratories and a modern reinforced concrete air-raid shelter under London Road that could hold approximately two-thousand people. The tunnels were built into old caves within the Rosherville Gardens – an area of land located between the cable works and the cliff face. It is likely that the air-raid shelter was factory-owned but also open to the public as Henley’s company did not actually own Rosherville Gardens at the time and it featured a number of amenities and six entrances. Henley’s company continued to thrive as the Victorian era ended; however, its success can be linked directly to the Great War as it was a catalyst for technological and industrial development and change. By the Second World War, Henley’s company was publicly praised for its contribution towards King and Country – particularly its contribution to ‘Operation Pluto’ (the construction of petrol pipelines across the English Channel). Despite this success, a decision was made to close the main Henley factory at Woolwich due to the repeated damaged it suffered during the war years. A new factory was subsequently built at Birtley in the North East due to its reputation for being a ‘misty valley’ that made it difficult for the Luftwaffe to target factories, and this was completed in 1950. 

      Sadly, a change of events occurred in 1958 when AEI acquired Henley’s company, having already taken over Siemens Bros in 1953. However, AEI is now the world’s oldest cable company and recently celebrated its one-hundred and seventy-fifth anniversary. Unfortunately, Henley’s Gravesend site was closed in 2008, though, due to it being ‘no longer viable to operate because of strong European competition’. 

      Our Version of Events

      Not much by way of events for this one. It’s been a very busy few months and we ended up here to take a break after doing a spot of house viewing. Since we’d spent all day and most of the evening looking at damp, shitty rental properties that all looked as though they ought to be photographed and placed as reports on here, we arrived outside AEI in the early hours of the morning. Armed only with the essentials, our tripods, cameras and cans of Stella Artois, we made our way over the epic bog that you have to cross to find the entrance to the old shelter. We really underestimated how muddy this bit of wasteland was going to be to be honest and very nearly ended up taking a cold midnight mud bath several times. Nevertheless, we eventually made it across, with all our beers intact you’ll be happy to know. From this point onwards, getting into the old shelter was pretty straightforward.  

      Once inside, we immediately set about taking our snaps. There was a shared feeling among us that the heavy feeling of tiredness was impending so we wanted to get the hard bit of the explore out of the way quickly. It didn’t really take long to photograph the place in the end though, once we’d worked out the general layout of the structure which is a grid-like setup. This left us with plenty of time to each pull up a chemical toilet and enjoy a few bevvies. And that’s how it ended. The tins were cracked and we sat wondering what it would have felt like to hear explosions outside and the thunder of guns shaking the paint and dirt from the ceiling. In reality, all we could really hear was a superb silence and the odd drip coming from a room to our left. What better way to finish an explore, with beers in hand and an abundance of chemical toilets at the ready. 

      Explored with Ford Mayhem. 
       
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