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Maniac

Cwm Coke, Beddau, Wales - Report 29/03/09

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Awesome!

Decaying rusty metal - Check!

Chimmny - Check!

Office full of paper work - Check!

Machinery still in situ - Check!

That explore has everything!

Cheers for posting it :thumb

Maniac.

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Guest dangerous dave

slow dont make me get on a train home mate stop showing me porn like this oh loving the whiter than white daz doorstep trainers

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Wicked pics mate, keep em coming, dave's doing his nut being stuck "darn sauf"

Wierdly enough, we heard dogs too, security??

Busy this weekend, but might be free the weekend after.

I'll drop you a PM to confirm. (no headache fails this time, promise)

J.

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