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Maniac

UK Harold Wood Hospital, Essex - May 2010

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I wasn't going to bother with a report, but I think I had just about enough photos to make it worthwhile, so may as well. Being very bored at the weekend, myself, Frosty and Obscurity decided to take ourselves off here to have a looksie. It was also the first exploring outing of the new car, the first of many I'm sure! :D

Our visit to this place was cut short by Mr security guard together with dog handler and badly trained dog, and a visit from the police who were very professional and just let us on our way. Becasue of this minor setback we only got to see inside the big main hospital building and didn't get to see the mortuary or other parts of the complex like we were hoping. However Harold Wood is more than a mortuary (even if the rest of it is quite knackered.)

Harold wood hospital closed its doors in 2006, and plans were submitted for housing. As far as I can work out these plans are being objected to by local residents resulting in a long drawn out process and leaving the site in limbo at the moment.

This place is used by Air Soft players, there were thousands of pellets everywhere inside the place, and players on another part of the site when we were in the building. It's a good job we exited that building when we did, as it was their next playing area and that could have hurt lots!

We managed precisely one building before being busted, although it is the biggest one it is the least interesting.

Anyway, have some pics!

1. Outside

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2. Operating Theatres

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3.

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4. Corridors etc.

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5.

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6.

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7.

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8.

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9. There are some bits and pieces left.

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10.

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11.

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12.

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13.

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14.

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15. Mint Bathroom

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16. Very Pink.

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thanks for looking!

Maniac.

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nice photos there dude, shame our trip was cut short but to be honest we probs picked the worst time to do it with air softers, security in the building as we entered and very active guards throughout the site lol. Better luck next time i suppose! ill get my photos up soon-ish :cool2:

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looks an interesting place there, shame it was cut short....what did the dog do lick ya rather that bark menacingly :lol:

As the police arrived the guy said something like

"Be careful of dog, I cannot control him properly"

That inspired a lot of confidence I must say.

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