Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Swamp_Donkey

Greece MV Panagiotis (Zakynthos Shipwreck) Sept 2010

Recommended Posts

Ok so not really urbex, more of a tourist attraction from my holiday. But it has quite an interesting story. Sorry the photo's arn't great, had to point and shoot as the only access is by boat. And thought it may be worthwhile sticking up.

So heres the history and the "story" of its demise.

A Coastal trading vessel, or Coaster, the Panagiotis was built in 1937 in Glasgow by Scotts Bowling, Yard 341, for the J. & A. Gardner and Co. Ltd. shipping company[1], and fitted with engines made by British Auxiliaries Ltd. At her launch, she measured 163 feet in length and 26 feet in width. She had a draft of just over 11 feet, and a gross register tonnage of 452. As a Coaster, her primary use was in the transportation of trade cargo through local, shallow waters. Her eventual use in the smuggling of goods may have led to her downfall in the early 1980s.

History

The Panagiotis has changed hands and names since her construction.

1937 - Originally named the MV Saint Bedan, she was launched on Thursday, 14 January 1937 from Glasgow.

1964 - She was sold to Greek owners, M. Gigilinis and S. Kakassinas of Thessaloniki (her port of registry), who renamed her Meropi.

1966 - She was renamed Charis.

1975 - She was sold by N.S. Kalfas to P. Lisikatos of Piraeus and renamed Panagiotis.

1980 - She ran aground in October, on the island of Zakynthos, and was abandoned.

Sinking

The most commonly accepted story regarding the wreck of the Panagiotis maintains that it spent the later part of its life as a smuggler ship. In 1980 (during a time of record population lows on the island of Zakynthos), Panagiotis was making its way from Turkey with a freight of contraband cigarettes (for the Italian Mafia, as some versions of the story assert). The crew was suspected by authorities, and so the Panagiotis was pursued by the Greek Navy. Encountering stormy weather, the ship ran aground in a shallow cove to the north of Porto Vromi, where the crew abandoned ship to evade the pursuing Navy. To this day, the wreck remains at the site which is now called "Navagio" for the Greek "shipwreck."

On with the pictures...

holiday077.jpg

holiday078.jpg

holiday079.jpg

holiday080.jpg

holiday084.jpg

holiday086.jpg

holiday087.jpg

holiday088.jpg

holiday092.jpg

holiday094.jpg

holiday095.jpg

And i even got a chair shot!

holiday096.jpg

Hope you enjoyed, my first report in a long time. Once again sorry for the quality of the pictures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By jane doe
      Predannack opened in 1941 as an RAF base, but today is the satellite airfield to RNAS Culdrose - it is a restricted MOD site and an active airfield used daily for flying training and also provides our Fire Fighting training facility. The area is heavily utilised by Culdrose helicopter squadrons, light fixed wing aircraft and, on an occasional basis by other aircraft types including jet aircraft, for a variety of reasons. Predominantly crews are involved in intensive training sorties involving a high cockpit workload. On average there is in excess of 2000 aircraft moves a month at the unit. The airfield is also used by the Fire Training School for live fire fighting and rescue instruction/exercises and there is also a rifle range at Predannack which is frequently used for live weapon firings. Additionally the airfield is used for a variety of additional tasks when the Control Tower is unmanned e.g. gliding.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
    • By Punk
      History
       
      Butternut is a foulwater storage tank in the suburb of Saint Henri. It was built in the 1980's with the increasing population of the local area. Essentially this is two long box sections, divided by pillars every 7 feet and split into 3 sections by 2 trenches for the soup to flow back into the sewerage system.
       
      Explore
       
      By this point in the week, our numbers were dwindling. Still a fun evening which was finished with mimosas on a friends balcony, before sleeping on said balcony.
      Although being entirely made of concrete, this was very photogenic. There was plenty of evidence of it's purpose on the floor, but the worms didn't seem to mind. There were hundreds of them.
      Great end to an epic week.
       
      (1)
       

       
      (2)
       

       
      (3)
       

       
      (4)
       

       
      Cheers for Looking
       
       



    • By Punk
      History
       

       
      The Canada Malting complex was designed by David Jerome Spence, and was built in 1904. On the west side of the complex there are nine violet coloured silos. They are covered in treated clay tiles that were manufactured by the Barnett and Record Co. of Minneapolis. These silos are rare examples of using this technique to cover and insulate silos. The cement silos on the other side were added in the 1940s, and were used to store the barley used to produce the malt. The barley was germinated and dried in the buildings that lined Saint-Ambroise Street. The factory had an enormous output of 250,000 pounds (110,000 kg) of malt per year, and distributed it to distilleries and breweries. The closing of the Lachine Canal in 1970 forced the company to transport its malt by train only, and around 1980, the building was actually too small and the transportation costs too high, so the company abandoned the site and moved into a new malting complex located at 205 Riverside and Mill Street, Montreal. The building was then sold for $500,000 and became a soya and corn storage facility for Quonta Holding Ltd, before it was abandoned in 1989 when Canadian National ceased its rail line service to factories in this area of the canal. The original clay silos are now protected as part of the Lachine Canal National Historic Site. They have been so battered from both the elements and vandalism, that it is no longer possible to restore them. There have been applications for it to be converted to accommodation, but all plans have been refused so far.
      Since being abandoned in 1989, the factory has been covered in graffiti on the outside as well as the inside of the building.
       

      Construction of the original silos in 1903
       
      Explore
       
      After a little trouble getting through customs, I was here 3 hours after first stepping foot on Canadian soil. I spent my first two nights sleeping here, one helping set up, another partying.
      Sadly my experience with customs was more costly than I initially thought. After guiding me to a search room, they tipped the contents of my rucksack out and my lens got damaged. £150 for the repair, and they had loads of questions regarding the contents of my luggage. *Note to self, don't take waders next time*. After an hour and a half, I was on the bus to my friend's apartment.

      This place is massive. When we returned a few days later, the 4 of us spent around 4 hours in here and only covered about 3 quarters of it. Sadly, I can see this lasting just a couple of years more before it gets knocked down, or it goes down of it's own accord. While on the rooftop we looked at the façade of the main building, and the wall is coming away at the corners.
      The local explorers have done an admirable job making this their own. They've cleared areas for social events, clear walkways for people to get around safely and have added features, like a wood burner and a bar.
      Considering I usually prefer underground stuff, I really enjoyed this place. The rooftop is among the best I've seen, it looks over downtown Montreal and Mont Royal. This is somewhere I would return to.
       
      (1)
       

       
      (2)
       

       
      (3)
       

       
      (4)
       

       
      (5)
       

       
      (6)
       

       
      (7)
       

       
      (8)
       

       
      (9)
       

       
      (10)
       

       
      (11)
       

       
      (12)
       

       
      (13)
       

       
      (14)
       

       
      (15)
       

       
      (16)
       

       
      (17)
       

       
      (18)
       

       
      (19)
       

       
      (20)
       

       
      Cheers for Looking
































    • By Punk
      History
       
      It's been pretty hard to find history on this one, especially with all the information being in French Canadian.

      Located in the Villeray-Saint-Michael-Parc area of Montreal, Saint Bernadine de Sienne was a Catholic church built between 1955 and 1956. As well as providing religious services and confession, the church served as a hub for the local community. It provided room for nurseries, sunday school, youth activities among other community services.
      With the local community changing, less people regularly attending church and the rising cost of maintenance, Saint Bernadine de Sienne closed it's doors for the last time in April 2017.
       
      Explore
       
      This was one explore in a week of shenanigans. With 3 Brits, 2 Canadians, an Aussie and a Slovenian, this was very much an international affair.
      Access was laughable.
      While in there, photos happened, then we spent a couple of hours pissing around. This is probably the most relaxed I've ever felt in a derp.
      This is a beautiful building, it'll be a shame if it fell into disrepair or got torn down. I'm not a big fan of religion, but religious structures like churches, temples and mosques can be stunningly beautiful. For a twentieth century church, this was mesmerising and very photogenic.
       
      (1)
       

       
      (2)
       

       
      (3)
       

       
      (4)
       

       
      (5)
       

       
      (6)
       

       
      (7)
       

       
      (8)
       

       
      Cheers for Looking


    • By Space Invader
      explored with...
      wevsky ,obscuirty ,stealh2k12,fortknoxo,urbanginger and six riff raff
      a little history ...

      This is a large and interesting complex, located at the northern end of a tight triangular junction with the Sheerness-on-Sea branch. First proposed in 1969, the construction of Sheerness Steel Works was given the go-ahead in 1971, building work beginning in that September on land largely occupied by Army playing fields. The building cost was priced at £10,000,000 (£105,921,790 at 2008 prices), and included swallowing up a goods yard recently made redundant by British Rail.
      The works, a private venture under Canadian ownership, commenced operation in November 1972, and was designed to recycle scrap cars into steel coils and rods. The latter were for use in reinforced concrete and the steel mill had the capacity to process 180,000 tons of scrap metal per annum. It was envisaged that the mill’s yearly capacity could be increased to 400,000 tons within four years and, indeed, an additional £5,000,000 was invested in the works in 1975 to meet this target. Steel was produced using the electric arc process, and the mill remained a profitable venture until the second half of 1980. Much of the scrap metal dealt with originated from Mayer Parry Recycling of Erith, this being shipped down the Thames. Scrap metal and finished steel were also carried to and from the works by rail, and for this operation, new wagon batches – tailor-made for this type of traffic – were produced by ''Procor''. The rolling stock was leased by the steel mill at a time when there were few privately-owned wagons running on British Rail; indeed, this was one of a small number of works which was not part of the nationalized British Steel.
      For many years the Sheerness Steel Mill was owned and operated by Canadian-based ''Co-Steel'', but with this company's struggling finances, it was sold to ASW Holdings Limited of Cardiff, Wales after a deal was finalized in December 1998. The latter could only keep the operation going until July 2002, the company subsequently going into receivership on 10th of that month - the end seemed nigh for the works. And in January 2003, Sheerness Steel was taken over by Thamesteel...
      on with the pics...























      thanks for looking
×