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Obscurity

Pugin’s Caves, Ramsgate – Sept 2010

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For years a forgotten system of passages and tunnels are rumored to have been left disused under Ramsgate. The larger and more recognized tunnels are referred to as St.Augustines caves. Early photos show these tunnels and many entrances. The tunnels suffered after a cliff collapse causing them to become split into many small sections. These are now sealed and sit under the st. Augustine’s Abbey. Next to the abbey is Pugin’s house. This is open to the public but the tunnels aren't accessible. After speaking to the monks at the abbey we found that pugins caves were unexplored and the monks had no knowledge of if they still exist. Well, a while later we are in to unlock the secrets of Pugin’s caves. They were constructed by Pugin for the purposes of smuggling.

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A & C 1867:-

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    • By BritishRanger
      Well, heres another easy explore I done recently with a few friends. This is only the second location I've visited, so be gentle!
       
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