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Fawley power station hampshire closed march 2013

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Odd how no such thing has been offered at Didcot A which closed at the same time...I'd be interested if it wasn't a trek and a workday!

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    • By farmer.ned
      it was actually a last minute decision to visit this explore.
      en route home from doing the manton colliery explore i passed the fomer pumping station at bracebridge with a shall i or sha,nt i so a quick turn round of the car 
      i squeezed in behind some twat in a skoda who thought it a very good idea to park across the entrance who then decided to move and the explore was on.


      Built in 1881 Bracebridge Pumping Station was part of Worksop's new sewage system. It used two steam-driven beam engines (together with a travelling crane) to pump the sewage to the effluent processing facility. The engine was coal-fired, with the coal being brought in from nearby Shireoaks Colliery by boat via the Chesterfield Canal. Like many Victorian pumping stations it was built with no little style, designed in an Italian Romanesque style including ornate cast-iron columns and a spiral staircase. Apparently these remain inside (the columns are most definitely visible on external view).

      Now Grade II Listed, the building along with 1.33 acres of land is currently bricked yp to prevent access so sorry no interior shots 
      the old pumping station has been like this since it was refurbished many years ago there was talk of turning it into an attraction but nothing has happened yet and possibly wont do for the forseeable future

      the old pumping station viewed from high hoe road

      the old beds still filled with water

      one of the victorian columns can still be seen through the windowless building


      rising upwards towards the ornate chimney
      a closer view of the ornate victorian columns

      the base of the chimney from the back of the pumping house

      the rear of the pumphouse

      the rear of the pumphouse and chimney

      the middle of the chimney with the lightning conductor on the right

      the top of the chimney and the lightning conductor

      someone had gained access inside by a rope tied to one of the windows but feeling a bit cream crackered i didnt fancy the tarzan routine so i didnt bother




    • By Punk
      History
       
      Owned and operated by Philadelphia Electric Company (now Exelon), the Port Richmond power generation station was built from 1919 to 1925. Designed by architect John T. Windrim and engineer W.C.L. Eglin, the coal-fired electrical generation plant was placed into service in 1925 and the station’s Neoclassical Revival design was used by the company to reflect permanence, stability, and responsibility. As designed, the station was to contain three distinct generating components; each component was to consist of a boiler house to produce steam, a turbine hall, and a switch gear building to control power distribution. At its peak, the Port Richmond station’s four huge steam turbines had a capacity of 600 megawatts.
       

       
      Explore
       
      This was the first mooch of a 3 week trip to the States.
      Philadelphia was a very interesting experience. Within 36 hours of arriving in Philly, I witnessed a racial gun incident, got pulled by the local law enforcement and saw a cop attacked with a firework. A week before I arrived the Eagles won their first Superbowl and the locals trashed the city in celebration. Interesting city, Philadelphia.
      Mooched around here with a guy from Montana and we enjoyed a few beers while walking around. Nice quiet explore, only interrupted when a scrappy followed us around briefly. I had been looking forward to this for months, and it was made better by the mist that had rolled in from the Delaware River.
       
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      Cheers for Looking

















































    • By Landie_Man
      I visited this site on two separate occasions; once in early April with a non-explorer friend; and again a week later with Mookster and our American Explorer friend who is over on a uni placement. 
      The site is in the middle of a busy town, right on the main road and is in pretty good condition; not surprising as it only closed in  December 2017.  Inside its very very bare and only a few features redeem it.  It's nice and relaxed and all the power is still on, meaning that the cell panic alarms work and can be silenced from the central panel.  
       
      Brentwood is one of several Police Stations in Essex to close recently; Tim and I explored Witham Station on the first visit.
       
      The Police Station was built in 1937 and In December 2015 it was announced by Police and Crime Commissioner Nick Alston, that 15 police stations were to be closed to the public in Essex as part of a £63million spending cut. Brentwood Police Station was one of the 9 Police Stations closing completely. He stated that the buildings were buildings were no longer fit for purpose.
      "Police officers, not buildings, fight crime," Chief Constable Stephen Kavanagh said.
       
      "We spend too much on too many police buildings, many of which are either no longer fit for policing or are hardly used by the public to report crime.
      Bentwood Police station was eventually closed to the public in April 2016, and was finally fully vacated by the Police in December 2017. 
       
      Police Operations have now moved to the local Town Hall. The building was closed as it cost £10million per year in running costs, and would have cost a further £30million in maintenance to bring it to modern standards. 
       
      Kemsley LLP have recently announced the earmarking of Brentwood Police Station for proposed residential development. The former Police Station extends to approximately 2.75 acres and a planning application is to be submitted for 70-100 dwellings as part new builds,and part conversion of existing buildings.
       
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      More At:
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157696171022175
    • By oldskool
      Ok lets go back 12 months when myself cuban bloodhound host and skin did this explore ....i posted the report in public on a urbex forum which the press some how got hold off so i deleted everything form forums,flickr and facebook .....now after seeing this
      ive decided to repost along with all press releases..... I power station is an oil-fired power station and dominates the local area with its 778 ft (237 m) chimney, the third tallest chimney in the UK and S's tallest free-standing structure. In common with other power stations in S it lacks cooling towers; instead, sea water is used as a coolant. The station consists of three generating units with a combined total rating of 1900 megawatts (MW).
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      History
      Construction began in 1970 for the then South of S Electricity Board (SSEB) in 1970. It was to be S's first oil-fired power station. However, the soaring price of oil as a result of the 1973 oil crisis meant that by the time construction was completed generation was uneconomical. It was therefore rarely utilised to anything near capacity, with 1200 MW being mothballed and the remaining capacity being used to satisfy peak demand. A notable example of when it was used at capacity was during the miners' strike of 1984-85, when low coal supplies prompted operation. Generation ceased in January 1988.
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      In construction, provision was made on site for a fourth generating unit (to the north of the existing units), including a fourth stack inside the chimney. One design feature of the power station is the lack of steam driven boiler feed pumps, with units 1 and 2 being provided with three 50% electric boiler feed pumps and unit 3 with two 50% electric feed pumps. The main turbo-generator was manufactured by Parsons, and many of the major components were interchangeable with the turbo-generators at Hunterston B around 13 miles (21 km) south, on the Firth of Clyde, also then owned by the South of S Electricity Board.
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      I power station was owned by the S Power utility group and had been mothballed as part of the strategic reserve. The station was decommissioned in 2006. Until then it could have been fired up at any point to supply power for the national grid. The power station's equipment was intact and continually operating dehumidifiers were used to keep it in good condition while the facility was mothballed.
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      The site is to be cleared for housing and small business development following demolitiion of the power station in mid- to late-2010. Preparatory demolition work started in April 2010. Large amounts of equipment were removed to be used as spares at other power stations, including switchgear, turbine rotors, and control equipment. Electrical oil and other chemicals have been drained to make the site safe. Demolition began in June 2010 with the removal of one of the three large oil tanks. November 2010 all three large oil tanks have now been removed from the site.....
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      A big thanks to Cuban Bloodhound and Skin for a wicked weekend in Scotland ...
      After an earlier explore we found our selfs on the beach near kip just waiting for sunset drinking beer ,Host decided to go to the car to try and get his head down for a few hours , me and Cuban had other ideas (of to the pub) emmmm....well after 5 pints and a vodka shot we were done ,i cant remember much after that it was all a blare hahahahahaha.....after staggering around for what seemed an age i heard a click and behold button amd switch industrial pornage ........
      This next shot was the first one i did its out of focus because of the beer effects lol.....picture fail
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      NOW the reason i deleted the report and all photos last time .......
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      Thanks for looking Oldskool..........i dubstep filmed by Millhouse staring Hidden Shadow , Fishbrain , Tweek , Nick uk and
      Gone85.........SNC CREW
       
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