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Nelly

Crookham Manor - AKA Harlequin Manor - Motability Manor - May 2013

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Splored with Skeleton Key, Lara, Trog and Peaches

Crookham Court stands on the former site of Crookham manor house, built around the start of 14th century and destroyed in 1543, and subsequently Crookham House which was demolished around 1850. The construction of the current building started around this time and continued in two more phases over the next fifty years.

It’s served several purposes such as a manor house, a junior school and a school for children of people serving at Greenham Common. It was abandoned for some time after the US Air Force left the area and purchased in 1961 when it was used as a boarding school until 1990

In 1988 three of the teaching staff were sentenced to a total of 26 years in prison for the long term sexual abuse of pupils, the school closed in 1989 and in 2012 another teacher, and then United Nations Head of Security in Kosovo was jailed for four years after a pupil filed complaints with police after informing his counseller of the abuse from his teenage years

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Yup, like some of the staff here would lend you 10p to phone Esther

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After we got out to get the externals we got spotted and gave it legs, we may have ended up using the neighbours garden as a short cut and found an animal graveyard, Pet Sematary or what?

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Edited by Nelly

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I really like your external shots Nelly, and the one of the madman on the mobility scooter.

Cracking report and pictures, and a little pet cemetery a nice find :D

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Guest PROJ3CTM4YH3M

Cracking report mate cant get enough of this place and came so close myself... Some lovely pics here the archways in particular top notch!

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