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UK Ushaw Collage-(VISITED.March 2011) 2013

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Im not at all religious, in fact im an atheist,but walking round this place made me think twice about things.

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Ushaw College

Ushaw College (St Cuthbert's College, Ushaw) is a Roman Catholic seminary, . It was founded at Douai as the English College, Douai in France in 1568, which moved to Ushaw Moor, four miles west of Durham in England in 1808 and became a Licensed Hall of the University of Durham in 1968. It is independent of the University but offers courses validated by the University. Both Church and lay students study at the college. In 2002 the College rejected a report from the Roman Catholic hierarchy that it should merge with St Mary's College, Oscott, near Birmingham. In October 2010 it was announced that the college is to close in the summer of 2011 due to the shortage of vocations in the Roman Catholic Church, and that the site is likely to be sold...

Some of the college's buildings are no longer used, but some have been converted into a conference centre. The main college buildings are grade II listed, however the College Chapel is grade II* and the Chapel of St Michael is grade I. The Refectory was designed and built by Pugin, as was the original chapel although this was later dismantled and replaced by the present building designed by Dunn and Hansom. The original college buildings (1804�1808) were designed by James Taylor.

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(College of St. Cuthbert)

A combined college and seminary for the six dioceses that were comprised in the old Northern Vicariate of England. The government is vested in a united board of the bishops of these dioceses, with a president, a vice-president, and staff of about 30 professors. The average number of students is over 300, divided into three courses: the preparatory course, including about 80 boys, thehumanity course with about 130, and the philosophical and theological with about 100.

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History

The suppression of the "Grands Anglais" at Douai the seminary which for 200 years had meant the Catholic Faith to England, was only one of the many far-reaching results that the French Revolution brought in its train. The immediate necessity under which the English Catholics found themselves of providing for the continuation of its work led to a project of establishing one college for the whole of England on English soil. Many difficulties supervened and finally the question arranged itself by the division of the refugee students from Douai into two bodies, one of which found shelter at Old Hall near Ware, while the remainder (mainly composed of students who were destined for the Northern Vicariate), after temporary sojourns at Tudhoe and Pontop, two villages in the vicinity of Durham, settled on 15 Oct., 1794, at Crook Hall, about eleven miles N.W. of that city. There they re-established Douai for the north of England, and it lived its life under the guidance of one of its former professors, Thomas Eyre, of John Lingard, the future historian, and of John Daniel, the actual president of Douai at its suppression, who seems to have been formally installed as president for a few days. Ten years' growth made Crook Hall inadequate for its purpose, and in 1804 Bishop William Gibson began the buildings at Ushaw to which four years later, the colony finallymigrated, the first detachment on 19 July, the rest on 2 August, 1808. There they found three sides of a massive quadrangle, with a frontage of about 170 feet and a depth of 220, ready for their habitation. The fourth side of this quadrangle was not added till 1819, under the president who succeeded Eyre in 1811, Dr. John Gillow; but no further material addition was made to the buildings until the fourth president, Charles Newsham, succeeded in 1837. He realized that, if Ushaw was adequately to continue its career, no pains nor expense must be spared to enlarge its capacity and to bring its arrangements into line with more modern requirements. The pioneers of the Gothic revival were at hand to assist him in this, and from the plans of the two Pugins and the two Hansoms the second church with its attendant chapels, the library, infirmary, museum, exhibition hall, lavatories, kitchens, and farm buildings, and a separate establishment for the younger boys, all sprang up around the old Georgian quadrangle.

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In much more than a convention sense Monsignor Newsham may be called the founder of modern Ushaw; and the best evidence of how far-seeing were his plans and achievements lies in the fact that for twenty years after his death, in 1863, practically no addition was made to the fabric. In 1883 Monsignor Wrennal found it necessary to build a third church. Under Bishop Wilkinson, whoassumed the presidency in 1890, which he held conjointly with the Bishopric of Hexham and Newcastle till his death in 1909, a fresh period of activity began. A covered swimming bath, a gymnasium, two new dormitories, and over forty new living rooms, the enlargement of the exhibition hall, the elaborate decoration of the church with the erection of a new high altar, are all the products of his nineteen years of presidency. Two presidents have held office since his death: Monsignor Joseph Corbishly, who survived him only a year, and Monsignor William Henry Brown, under whom new lecture rooms have been erected to accommodate the largely increased numbers of philosophy and divinity students. Altogether the present blocks of buildings, with their enclosed courts, cover a rectangle 880 feet long by 420 feet broad; the outbuildings, grounds, and campus cover over 100 acres, and the whole estate, with its home and outlying farms, includes between 1200 and 1300 acres.

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Many objects of historical and artistic interest are preserved in the college. Lingard bequeathed to it all his books and papers, which included an early manuscript and the proof sheets of his "History of England" with about 1500 of his letters; Wiseman is represented by the manuscripts of "Fabiola" and the "Hidden Gem", and of many sermons, lectures, and letters, while Eyre gathered for it a valuable collection of documents dealing with the English Catholic history of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and intended for a continuation of Dodd's "Church History". Thelibrary, in which these are stored, contains about 45,000 volumes, mainly of theological and historical interest. It is especially rich in early printed liturgical books and in seventeenth-century controversy. Examples of Wynken de Worde's "York Manual", Higden's "Polychronicon", the "Nuremburg Chronicle", the "Ulm Cosmographs", the "Complutensian Polyglot", are found on its shelves, and, perhaps more interesting than all, about forty works that belonged to the pre-Reformation library of Durham Abbey and which still retain the original monastic bindings.

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Visited with Host and Frank, thanks to Bugsuperster.....

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Thanks for looking Oldskool.........

 

 

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Guest Scattergun

Awesome stuff, loved this place :) Still never figured out they gates but.

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This has been on my list for ages, you've just managed to move it back up the list again. Thanks for sharing

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    • By Mikeymutt
      I have sat on this one for a fair while.earlier in the year I made quite a lot of trips here trying to find various bits of it.I had been on a visit here years ago and saw some bits,but I knew there was so much more to it.being near to me it was essy to go regularly to check it out.there is security on the site and cameras.so you just have to be a bit careful.Coltishall is now used as an industrial estate with many old buildings in use.it started off as battle of Britain fighter base during the second world war.fighter planes off various sorts were flown from here including hurricanes and spitfires.after the war it was used heavily in the cold war and was designated as a V bomber dispersal site.basically a back up airfield if the aircrafts hme airfield was damaged.the last planes to be based here was the jaguar jets.these saw service in the first gulf war.with the introduction of the euro fighter Coltishall was deemed none essential and so the station closed in 2006.it was a big question what was going to happen to the site.then Norfolk county council stepped in and bought it and this raised a few eyebrows.there track record is not great.
       
      SERGEANTS MESS
       
      I have visited the officers mess a few times meeting up with pretty vacant and JSP o one time as they visited too.the sergeants mess though is like the officers mess but not so grand.here the NCO's could relax and unwind,there was accommodation provided on the wings and a new block added.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      The more modern accommodation blocks.
       

       

       

       

       
      RECREATION

      As usual with the armed forces recreation is a big factor.on coltishall there was a pool,gym and five aside football plus fields for grass sports.sadly the gym is a no go now.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      BATTERY MAINTENANCE

      This building was for storage off batteries for planes and veichles.jet planes carry some hefty batteries so a place was needed to store them safely,also there was a bit at the front for testing and draining the batteries.it had a morgue feel to it and now known as the battery morgue.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      BOMB STORES AND FUEL

      A different way in was needed to do these as they are a fair way from the main site.and with CCTV covering the way down I did not want to get caught in the open.like most airfields the bomb stores are located a fair way from the main base for safety.and near to where they would take off.here there was a large building for testing the bombs and making sure they were safe.nearby is the fuel stores.not sure if these were for the planes or not.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Fuelling depot
       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      HANGAR

      AS per standard there are four hangars here.several are in use.most of the maintenance work on the planes went on in here.to the sides there is offices and canteen areas.there was seriously nice airmans graffiti in here.


       

       

       

       

       
       

       

       
      JET TESTING

      With the advancement of jet engines on planes there was a need to test the engines.coltishall had two testing parts,an indoor and an outdoor one.the out door one allowed the planes to back up to the exhaust duct and fire up its engines which would then be passed through the exhaust duct and through the chambers.the test bay is surrounded by thick concrete blast walls.
       

       

       

       

       

       
      The indoor one was a similar style to the other.but this was used for engines unattached to the plane.acroos the way is another building,this was were they would repair the engines,they would then be transported to the tester.clamps on a rail would move across and grab the engine.it would then be moved to the exhaust duct for testing.note the array of cameras around the clamping system to monitior the testing process.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      The indoor one was a similar style to the other.but this was used for engines unattached to the plane.acroos the way is another building,this was were they would repair the engines,they would then be transported to the tester.clamps on a rail would move across and grab the engine.it would then be moved to the exhaust duct for testing.note the array of cameras around the clamping system to monitior the testing process.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      Thank you for looking.I did take lots more photos here but I could be forever on this post .with more smaller buildings.
    • By AndyK!
      This turned out to be a good day out with @SpiderMonkey and Exxperious.  This is a big site, by far the largest RAF base I've explored in terms of area covered, so we spent the whole day looking around it. 
       
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      The base was used by the RAF during the Second World War, and then used by the United States Air Force from 1951 until 1993, primarily for efforts during the Cold War. Bentwaters was to play a key role in the defence of Western Europe during the Cold War when large numbers of USAF aircraft were assigned as part of the air arm of NATO.
       
      Current Uses
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      Aerial view of the site after becoming Bentwaters Parks

      Star Wars Building

      The so-called “Star Wars Building” is surrounded by concrete blast walls and contains some interesting spaces including a medical room.


      The Star Wars Building


      Concrete blast walls


      Entrance of the Star Wars Building






      Medical Facility

      Bomb Stores

      Built during the Cold War to securely store nuclear and conventional weapons, the bomb store was heavily fortified with three layers of fencing, razor wire, a swing-arm vehicle barrier, two gates, pressure pads, armoured guard house, guard tower and overhead cables to keep helicopters out.

      We didn’t get passed the gate!



      Entrance to the Bomb Stores


      Armoured Guard House






      One of the storage facilities with overhead cables

      One of the store buildings had a couple of old fire engines parked up behind it....








      Planes and Helicopters

      There are all sorts of jet aeroplanes and helicopters parked up around the site, in varying states of decay and dismantlement.


      Exxperious modelling his entry into "Miss Fighter Jet 2018"



























      K-9 Building

      The K-9 building contains spacious dog kennels.


      K-9 Building


      Kennels inside the K-9 Building




      Hangers

      The site has a lot of hardened aircraft shelters, or hangers, spread out across a vast area. Several are in use by private companies, and others are empty. A common feature of the hangers is the huge sliding doors that form the entire hanger's frontage – these slide to the side on rails to open up fully allowing access for aeroplanes.


      One of the many hangers


      Typical interior of the hangers


      Original sliding door controls


      The framework sits on rails and supports the huge doors, allowing them to slide fully open


      527th Aggressor Squadron Hardened Aircraft Shelter


      Deputy Commander Operations

      This building had been out of use for quite some time and is suffering a lot of decay. The moisture and condensation cause constant rainfall inside the building, which was ideal for plant growth.


      Deputy Commander Operations building





      Runway, Control Tower and Maintenance Vehicles

      We didn’t make it over to the control tower, which is situated within the live business park area of the site. The runway still has some of the maintenance and de-icing vehicles parked up.


      The Control Tower pictured in 1972


      The Control Tower today (poor quality due to crazy crop, as we didn't go over there!)


      North/South runway with the control tower in the distance


      De-icer truck





      The Hush House

      Originally built as a jet engine testing facility with an exhaust tunnel, the Hush House was a soundproofed hangar where fighter


      Exterior of the exhaust tunnel


      Interior of the Hush House


      The exhaust tunnel


      Hush House control booth and viewing window


      Thanks for looking!


      Of course I got a selfie!
       
    • By Stevepg
      production ceased in 2015 most of the buildings demolished and operational plant removed; seems to be visited occasionally by security company whilst it is flogged off































    • By Stevepg
      Must have just missed the last visitor; no longer a pink nightie never mind red dress!! it pisses me off that needy individuals have to leave a tag "oooooo look at me ive left my mark" just get in have a mooch take your pix and fuck off out; its not big its not clever to steal items or cause damage that just causes bigger problems for other explorers

































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